varices


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

var·i·ces

 (văr′ĭ-sēz′)
n.
Plural of varix.

varices

(ˈværɪˌsiːz)
n
(Pathology) the plural of varix

var•ix

(ˈvɛər ɪks)

n., pl. var•i•ces (ˈvɛər əˌsiz)
1. Also, varicosity. a varicose vein.
2. a ridgelike mark or scar on the surface of a gastropod shell.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin: varicose vein]
Translations

varices

pl de varix
References in periodicals archive ?
"This caused Alannah to develop varices, which are dilated blood vessels in the oesophagus that can be life-threatening if they rupture.
Belapectin is the first drug to show positive results in a clinical trial in patients with compensated NASH cirrhosis without esophageal varices, and it is with great optimism that we anticipate a fourth quarter launch of this very important trial."
Esophageal varices and ascites occur after portal pressure exceeds 10-12 mm Hg (1-3).
Objective: To determine the safety and efficacy of N-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate in bleeding gastric varices in children.
Upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination revealed grade 3 esophageal and fundal varices (Figure 1a, 1b).
Endoscopic therapy is usually the initial treatment option for bleeding duodenal varices, but it is not always feasible or successful (2).
Among the various possible evaluations, in clinical practice, the assessment of the presence of varices and of the extent of fibrosis in the liver and spleen are certainly the most important.
Upon endoscopy, most patients are found to harbour esophageal varices while in a minority of patients, gastric varices are the primary sites of bleeding.
Approximately 50% of the patients develop esophageal varices while a small percentage develops complications in the other part of the gastrointestinal tract like ectopic varices in the small bowel [4, 5].