varnish


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var·nish

 (vär′nĭsh)
n.
1.
a. A liquid that contains a solvent and an oxidizing or evaporating binder and is applied to a surface to produce a hard, transparent finish after evaporation and curing.
b. The smooth coating or gloss resulting from the application of this liquid: Wear dulled the floor's varnish.
2.
a. Something suggestive of or resembling varnish.
b. An often deceptive external appearance or outward show: "people through whom a native stupidity shines forth past any varnish of education or acculturation" (Ira Sher).
tr.v. var·nished, var·nish·ing, var·nish·es
1. To cover with varnish.
2. To give a smooth and glossy finish to.
3. To give a superficial or deceptive appearance to: varnish the truth.

[Middle English vernisshe, from Old French vernis, from Medieval Latin veronix, vernix, sandarac resin, from Medieval Greek verenikē, from Greek Berenikē, Berenice (Benghazi), an ancient city of Cyrenaica.]

var′nish·er n.

varnish

(ˈvɑːnɪʃ)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds) Also called: oil varnish a preparation consisting of a solvent, a drying oil, and usually resin, rubber, bitumen, etc, for application to a surface where it polymerizes to yield a hard glossy, usually transparent, coating
2. (Elements & Compounds) a similar preparation consisting of a substance, such as shellac or cellulose ester, dissolved in a volatile solvent, such as alcohol. It hardens to a film on evaporation of the solvent. See also spirit varnish
3. (Elements & Compounds) Also called: natural varnish the sap of certain trees used to produce such a coating
4. a smooth surface, coated with or as with varnish
5. an artificial, superficial, or deceptively pleasing manner, covering, etc; veneer
6. (Clothing & Fashion) chiefly Brit another word for nail polish
vb (tr)
7. to cover with varnish
8. to give a smooth surface to, as if by painting with varnish
9. to impart a more attractive appearance to
10. to make superficially attractive
[C14: from Old French vernis, from Medieval Latin veronix sandarac, resin, from Medieval Greek berenikē, perhaps from Greek Berenikē, city in Cyrenaica, Libya where varnishes were used]
ˈvarnisher n

var•nish

(ˈvɑr nɪʃ)
n.
1. a preparation for coating surfaces, as of wood, consisting of resinous matter dissolved in oil, alcohol, or the like.
2. the sap of certain trees, used for the same purpose.
3. any of various other preparations similarly used, as one having India rubber as its chief constituent.
4. a coating or surface of varnish.
5. something suggesting this; gloss.
6. superficial polish, esp. to conceal some inadequacy.
v.t.
8. to coat with varnish.
9. to give a glossy appearance to.
10. to give an improved appearance to.
11. to give a superficially pleasing appearance to, esp. in order to deceive: to varnish the truth.
[1300–50; Middle English varnisch < Middle French vernis, verniz < Medieval Latin vernicium sandarac < Medieval Greek bernikē, syncopated variant of Greek Berenikē, city in Cyrenaica]
var′nish•er, n.
var′nish•y, adj.

varnish


Past participle: varnished
Gerund: varnishing

Imperative
varnish
varnish
Present
I varnish
you varnish
he/she/it varnishes
we varnish
you varnish
they varnish
Preterite
I varnished
you varnished
he/she/it varnished
we varnished
you varnished
they varnished
Present Continuous
I am varnishing
you are varnishing
he/she/it is varnishing
we are varnishing
you are varnishing
they are varnishing
Present Perfect
I have varnished
you have varnished
he/she/it has varnished
we have varnished
you have varnished
they have varnished
Past Continuous
I was varnishing
you were varnishing
he/she/it was varnishing
we were varnishing
you were varnishing
they were varnishing
Past Perfect
I had varnished
you had varnished
he/she/it had varnished
we had varnished
you had varnished
they had varnished
Future
I will varnish
you will varnish
he/she/it will varnish
we will varnish
you will varnish
they will varnish
Future Perfect
I will have varnished
you will have varnished
he/she/it will have varnished
we will have varnished
you will have varnished
they will have varnished
Future Continuous
I will be varnishing
you will be varnishing
he/she/it will be varnishing
we will be varnishing
you will be varnishing
they will be varnishing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been varnishing
you have been varnishing
he/she/it has been varnishing
we have been varnishing
you have been varnishing
they have been varnishing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been varnishing
you will have been varnishing
he/she/it will have been varnishing
we will have been varnishing
you will have been varnishing
they will have been varnishing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been varnishing
you had been varnishing
he/she/it had been varnishing
we had been varnishing
you had been varnishing
they had been varnishing
Conditional
I would varnish
you would varnish
he/she/it would varnish
we would varnish
you would varnish
they would varnish
Past Conditional
I would have varnished
you would have varnished
he/she/it would have varnished
we would have varnished
you would have varnished
they would have varnished
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.varnish - a coating that provides a hard, lustrous, transparent finish to a surfacevarnish - a coating that provides a hard, lustrous, transparent finish to a surface
coating, coat - a thin layer covering something; "a second coat of paint"
fixative - a varnish dissolved in alcohol and sprayed over pictures to prevent smudging
shellac varnish, shellac - a thin varnish made by dissolving lac in ethanol; used to finish wood
Verb1.varnish - cover with varnishvarnish - cover with varnish      
coat, surface - put a coat on; cover the surface of; furnish with a surface; "coat the cake with chocolate"
shellac, shellack - cover with shellac; "She wanted to shellac the desk to protect it from water spots"

varnish

noun
1. lacquer, polish, glaze, japan, gloss, shellac The varnish comes in six natural shades.
verb
1. lacquer, polish, glaze, japan, gloss, shellac The painting still has to be varnished
2. polish, decorate, glaze, adorn, gild, lacquer, embellish The floors have all been varnished.

varnish

verb
To give a deceptively attractive appearance to:
Idioms: paper over, put a good face on.
Translations
لَمْعَهوَرْنِيشوَرْنيش: طِلاء للتّلميعيُبَرْنِقُيُغَطّي بالوَرْنيش
laklakovatpolitura
laklakerefernis
lakatalakkapintakiilto
laklakirati
fényezfénymázkencelakklakkoz
gljái, glanslakk, fernislakka
ニスニスを塗る
니스니스를 칠하다
lakalakotnolakot
politúra
lak
fernissa
ใส่น้ำมันชักเงาน้ำมันชักเงา
cilacilâcilalamakcilâlamakvernik
đánh véc-nivéc-ni

varnish

[ˈvɑːnɪʃ]
A. N (for wood) → barniz m; (for nails) → esmalte m (para las uñas), laca f (para las uñas) (fig) → barniz m, apariencia f
B. VT [+ wood] → barnizar; [+ nails] → pintar, laquear

varnish

[ˈvɑːrnɪʃ]
nvernis m
vt [+ table, floor, wood] → vernir
to varnish one's nails → se vernir les ongles

varnish

n (lit)Lack m; (on pottery) → Glasur f; (on furniture also, on painting) → Firnis m; (fig)Politur f
vtlackieren; floorboards alsoversiegeln, einlassen (S Ger, Aus); paintingfirnissen; potteryglasieren; (fig) truth, factsbeschönigen

varnish

[ˈvɑːnɪʃ]
1. n (for wood) → vernice f trasparente; (for nails) → smalto
2. vt (wood) → verniciare; (nails) → smaltare
to varnish one's nails → smaltarsi le unghie
varnish over vt + adv to varnish over sth (event, fact) → mascherare qc

varnish

(ˈvaːniʃ) noun
1. a usually clear sticky liquid which gives protection and a glossy surface to wood, paint etc.
2. the glossy surface given by this liquid. Be careful or you'll take the varnish off the table!
verb
to cover with varnish. Don't sit on that chair – I've just varnished it.

varnish

وَرْنِيش, يُبَرْنِقُ lak, lakovat lak, lakere Lack, lackieren βερνίκι, βερνικώνω barniz, barnizar lakata, lakka vernir, vernis lak, lakirati vernice, verniciare ニス, ニスを塗る 니스, 니스를 칠하다 vernis, vernissen lakk, lakkere lakier, polakierować envernizar, verniz лак, лакировать fernissa ใส่น้ำมันชักเงา, น้ำมันชักเงา cila, cilalamak đánh véc-ni, véc-ni 清漆, 给…涂清漆
References in classic literature ?
The little that was left in the world, when all these deductions were made, it was Mrs General's province to varnish. In that formation process of hers, she dipped the smallest of brushes into the largest of pots, and varnished the surface of every object that came under consideration.
Neither had the fame of Cicero, Seneca, Plinius Secundus, borne her age so well, if it had not been joined with some vanity in themselves; like unto varnish, that makes ceilings not only shine but last.
The sun burned down upon the glassy sea and the white deck till the varnish on the rails cracked and blistered, and the sweat streamed like water from the faces of the labouring seamen.
"It sounds like the name of some new floor varnish."
Through the varnish of politeness which overlaid his manner, there rose to the surface the underlying insolence, hidden, on all ordinary occasions, from all human eyes.
To our surprise, we were ushered into a room where the first object that met the eye was a painter's easel, with a table beside it covered with rolls of canvas, bottles of oil and varnish, palette, brushes, paints, &c.
The wide expanse that opened out before the heights on which the Russian batteries stood guarding the bridge was at times veiled by a diaphanous curtain of slanting rain, and then, suddenly spread out in the sunlight, far-distant objects could be clearly seen glittering as though freshly varnished. Down below, the little town could be seen with its white, red-roofed houses, its cathedral, and its bridge, on both sides of which streamed jostling masses of Russian troops.
A clock, in a splintered and battered oblong box of varnished wood, she suddenly regarded as an abomination.
And that sort of faithful and proud devotion went so far as to make him go about flicking the dust off the varnished teak-wood rail of the little craft with a silk pocket-handkerchief - a present from Mrs.
I found myself in a salon with a very well-painted, highly varnished floor; chairs and sofas covered with white draperies, a green porcelain stove, walls hung with pictures in gilt frames, a gilt pendule and other ornaments on the mantelpiece, a large lustre pendent from the centre of the ceiling, mirrors, consoles, muslin curtains, and a handsome centre table completed the inventory of furniture.
Her mother perceived, for the first time, that the second vehicle was not a humble conveyance like the first, but a spick-and-span gig or dog-cart, highly varnished and equipped.
A project had but to be new, and it came home to her mind, brightly varnished and gilded as a glittering toy.