varve


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varve

 (värv)
n.
A layer or series of layers of sediment deposited in a body of still water in one year.

[Swedish varv, layer, from varva, to bend, from Old Norse hverfa.]

varve

(vɑːv)
n
1. (Geological Science) a typically thin band of sediment deposited annually in glacial lakes, consisting of a light layer and a dark layer deposited at different seasons
2. (Geological Science) either of the layers of sediment making up this band
[C20: from Swedish varv layer, from varva, from Old Norse hverfa to turn]

varve

(vɑrv)

n.
a pair of thin contrasting layers of lake-bed sediment, representing a year's cycle of sedimentation.
[1920–25; < Swedish varv a round, (complete) turn]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, the sequences of glaciolacustrine varved clays from both, proximal and distal sides of the ridge, as well as from the top, are easy to correlate varve by varve.
In our days, when annually laminated sediments have been discovered in different sedimentological environments, varve has become a common word for a sediment structure representing the deposition during a single year, including several seasonal sublayers of different composition and colour.
Varve formation and the climatic record in an alpine proglacial lake: Calibrating annually-laminated sediments against hydrological and meteorological data.
Master cores were taken from each lake for detailed lithostratigraphic description and varve counting at the locations providing the most complete late glacial stratigraphical record.
These tree-ring data and varve data from leaves are simply excellent to tie together the varve data to tree-ring data, because there are 4,000 years of overlap.
VARVE A Armenian order of clergy B Type of walrus C Layer of clay deposited in still water who am I?
Esialgu voidi tooriistu ja varve tema pojale hoida, ent tolle surma voi valismaale siirdumise jarel muudi need arvatavasti monele meistrile voi tsunftile maha.
Reconstruction of climate and glacial history based on a comparison of varve and tree-ring records from Mirror Lake, Northwest Territories, Canada.
This layered deposit of sediment is called a varve, and the researchers used glacial varves collected in the 1980s and 1990s for (http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-01273-1) their study , corresponding to a 1,000-year time period between 13,000 and 12,000 years ago.&nbsp;A thicker layer in a varve is an indicator of more melting since a larger volume of water would be needed to carry more debris.