vaudeville


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vaude·ville

 (vôd′vĭl′, vōd′-, vô′də-)
n.
1.
a. Stage entertainment offering a variety of short acts such as slapstick turns, song-and-dance routines, and juggling performances.
b. A theatrical performance of this kind; a variety show.
2. A light comic play that often includes songs, pantomime, and dances.
3. A popular, often satirical song.

[French, alteration of Old French vaudevire, occasional or topical light popular song, possibly short for chanson du Vau de Vire, song of Vau de Vire, a valley of northwest France, or perhaps dialectal vauder, to go + virer, to turn; see veer1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vaudeville

(ˈvəʊdəvɪl; ˈvɔː-)
n
1. (Theatre) chiefly US and Canadian variety entertainment consisting of short acts such as acrobatic turns, song-and-dance routines, animal acts, etc, popular esp in the early 20th century. Brit name: music hall
2. (Theatre) a light or comic theatrical piece interspersed with songs and dances
[C18: from French, from vaudevire satirical folk song, shortened from chanson du vau de Vire song of the valley of Vire, a district in Normandy where this type of song flourished]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vaude•ville

(ˈvɔd vɪl, ˈvoʊd-, ˈvɔ də-)

n.
1. a form of popular entertainment in the U.S. from the late 1800s to the mid 1920s, having a program of separate and varied acts.
2. a light theatrical piece interspersed with songs and dances.
[1730–40; < French, shortened alter. of Middle French chanson du vau de Vire song of the vale of Vire, a valley of Calvados, France, noted for satirical folksongs]
vaude•vil′lian, n., adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

vaudeville

- Comes from a French composer calling his songs "chanson du Vau de vire"—"song of the valley of Vire (in Normandy)"—later shortened to "vau de ville."
See also related terms for songs.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

vaudeville

A variety review of contemporary song and dance. It enjoyed its heyday before the advent of cinema.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vaudeville - a variety show with songs and comic acts etc.vaudeville - a variety show with songs and comic acts etc.
variety show, variety - a show consisting of a series of short unrelated performances
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
فودفيل: إسْتِعْراض مَسْرَحي
kabaretvarieté
syngespilvaudeville
énekes-zenés vígjáték
gamansÿning
vodevilis
vodeviļa
taşlamalı güldürüvodvil

vaudeville

[ˈvəʊdəvɪl] Nvodevil m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

vaudeville

[ˈvɔːdəvɪl ˈvəʊdəvɪl] n (mainly US)vaudeville m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

vaudeville

n (US) → Varieté nt, → Varietee nt

vaudeville

:
vaudeville show
nVarieté(-) or Varietee (→ vorführung f) nt
vaudeville singer
nVarieté- or Varieteesänger(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

vaudeville

[ˈvəʊdəvɪl] n (esp Am) → vaudeville m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

vaudeville

(ˈvoːdəvil) noun
the type of theatre show in which there is a variety of short acts; music-hall. There are very few theatres now where vaudeville is performed.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
In short, he renovated them against their next trips out on vaudeville time or circus engagement.
A Jacob's-ladder leading to the vaudeville stage, with angels ascending and descending.
The pale and youthful father of a family, with the face of Shelley, who wrote vaudeville turns for a living and blank verse tragedies and sonnet cycles for the despair of managers and publishers, hid himself in a concrete cell with three-foot walls, so piped, that, by turning a lever, the whole structure spouted water upon the impending intruder.
It's vaudeville. One turn follows another--jugglers, acrobats, rubber-jointed wonders, fire-dancers, coon-song artists, singers, players, female impersonators, sentimental soloists, and so forth and so forth.
"My dear," Harley said to Villa at the conclusion of one such singing, "it's fortunate for him that you are not an animal trainer, or, rather, I suppose, it would be better called 'trained animal show-woman'; for you'd be topping the bill in all the music-halls and vaudeville houses of the world."
I started it in vaudeville, and went so big that my agent shifted me to the restaurants, and they have to call out the police reserves to handle the crowd.
And he pointed to a magnificent hotel situated on the very spot whereon the Vaudeville now stands.
'INTRIGUE ON THE RAMPARTS; or THE DAY OF REPENTANCE: vaudeville with new songs to the most favorite airs.' The deuce!
The subject of their discourse was one Mike Donlin, as he appeared in vaudeville.
I'll make a little piece out of it for the Vaudeville." And he rubbed his hands with glee.
You procure your mistresses from the opera, the Vaudeville, or the Varietes; I purchased mine at Constantinople; it cost me more, but I have nothing to fear."
Don't answer back as though we were a vaudeville team doing a cross-talk act.