vegetable ivory


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vegetable ivory

n.
A hard ivorylike material obtained from the ivory nut and used in making small objects such as buttons.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vegetable ivory

n
1. (Elements & Compounds) the hard whitish material obtained from the endosperm of the ivory nut: used to make buttons, ornaments, etc
2. (Plants) another name for the ivory nut
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

veg′etable i′vory


n.
the hard endosperm of the ivory nut, used to make buttons, ornamentation, etc.
[1835–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vegetable ivory - nutlike seed of a South American palmvegetable ivory - nutlike seed of a South American palm; the hard white shell takes a high polish and is used for e.g. buttons
ivory palm, ivory plant, ivory-nut palm, Phytelephas macrocarpa - a stemless palm tree of Brazil and Peru bearing ivory nuts
seed - a small hard fruit
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Well, it is a vegetable ivory palm, and they run to about fifty or sixty feet.
The buttons are made from a product called organic corozo, commonly known as vegetable ivory due to its resemblance to actual ivory.
Called "vegetable ivory" because it's white, smooth, and you can carve it, tagua was once used to make buttons but fell out of favor thanks to plastic.
Nicknamed "vegetable ivory," the tagua seed from South America can be easily carved and created into jewelry, just like ivory.
Tagua nuts come from the ivory palm and are sometimes referred to as vegetable ivory. When carved into netsuke, some of the outer shell is often left on - as here, where it's used for the hair and eyebrows.
Referred to as "vegetable ivory" or "the rain forest ivory," a tagua palm produces, in just one year, the same amount of "ivory" as a female elephant.
Vegetable ivory is the collective term for the hard endosperm of palms, which is rich in hemicelluloses and oil.