vehemence

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ve·he·ment

 (vē′ə-mənt)
adj.
Characterized by forcefulness of expression or intensity of emotion or conviction; fervid: a vehement denial.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin vehemēns, vehement-, perhaps from vehere, to carry; see wegh- in Indo-European roots.]

ve′he·mence, ve′he·men·cy n.
ve′he·ment·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ve•he•mence

(ˈvi ə məns)

also ve′he•men•cy,



n.
1. the quality of being vehement.
2. vigorous impetuosity; fury.
[1520–30; < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vehemence - intensity or forcefulness of expressionvehemence - intensity or forcefulness of expression; "the vehemence of his denial"; "his emphasis on civil rights"
intensiveness, intensity - high level or degree; the property of being intense
overemphasis - too much emphasis
2.vehemence - the property of being wild or turbulentvehemence - the property of being wild or turbulent; "the storm's violence"
intensiveness, intensity - high level or degree; the property of being intense
savageness, savagery - the property of being untamed and ferocious; "the coastline is littered with testaments to the savageness of the waters"; "a craving for barbaric splendor, for savagery and color and the throb of drums"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

vehemence

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

vehemence

noun
Exceptionally great concentration, power, or force, especially in activity:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

vehemence

[ˈviːɪməns] N [of words, person, criticism, protest] → vehemencia f; [of attack] → violencia f; [of opposition] → fuerza f, radicalidad f; [of denial] → rotundidad f; [of dislike] → intensidad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

vehemence

[ˈviːəməns] nvéhémence f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

vehemence

nVehemenz f (geh); (of actions, feelings also)Heftigkeit f; (of love, hatred also)Leidenschaftlichkeit f; (of protests also)Schärfe f, → Heftigkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

vehemence

[ˈviːɪməns] nveemenza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
At last the father said: "We feel highly honoured by your Majesty's proposal, but you see our daughter is a tender young thing, and we fear that in the vehemence of your affection you might possibly do her some injury.
I've come to buy you, and take you home," said George, with impetuous vehemence.
'My children, my defrauded, swindled infants!' cried Mr Kenwigs, pulling so hard, in his vehemence, at the flaxen tail of his second daughter, that he lifted her up on tiptoe, and kept her, for some seconds, in that attitude.
'May she wake in torment!' he cried, with frightful vehemence, stamping his foot, and groaning in a sudden paroxysm of ungovernable passion.
The child died "Thank God!" she added with sudden vehemence, and "I--well, you will wonder how I came to this, I wonder myself-- it has all happened but six months ago, and yet I seem to have forgotten--only the broken- hearted and the hungry would understand, if I could remember--and yet it was not life, certainly not life I wanted--and yet I couldn't die--"
This inflamed his rage; he repeated his threatenings, and turning to his companions, spoke with great vehemence in the Japanese language, as I suppose, often using the word CHRISTIANOS.
It is curious to observe, with what vehemence this part of the plan is assailed, on the principle here taken notice of, by men who profess to admire, without exception, the constitution of this State; while that constitution makes the Senate, together with the chancellor and judges of the Supreme Court, not only a court of impeachments, but the highest judicatory in the State, in all causes, civil and criminal.