vehement


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ve·he·ment

 (vē′ə-mənt)
adj.
Characterized by forcefulness of expression or intensity of emotion or conviction; fervid: a vehement denial.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin vehemēns, vehement-, perhaps from vehere, to carry; see wegh- in Indo-European roots.]

ve′he·mence, ve′he·men·cy n.
ve′he·ment·ly adv.

vehement

(ˈviːɪmənt)
adj
1. marked by intensity of feeling or conviction; emphatic
2. (of actions, gestures, etc) characterized by great energy, vigour, or force; furious
[C15: from Latin vehemēns ardent; related to vehere to carry]
ˈvehemence, ˈvehemency n
ˈvehemently adv

ve•he•ment

(ˈvi ə mənt)

adj.
1. zealous; impassioned: a vehement defense.
2. characterized by rancor or anger.
3. marked by great energy: a vehement shake of the head.
[1475–85; < Latin vehement-, s. of vehemēns, vēmēns violent, forceful]
ve′he•ment•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.vehement - marked by extreme intensity of emotions or convictionsvehement - marked by extreme intensity of emotions or convictions; inclined to react violently; fervid; "fierce loyalty"; "in a tearing rage"; "vehement dislike"; "violent passions"
intense - possessing or displaying a distinctive feature to a heightened degree; "intense heat"; "intense anxiety"; "intense desire"; "intense emotion"; "the skunk's intense acrid odor"; "intense pain"; "enemy fire was intense"
2.vehement - characterized by great force or energyvehement - characterized by great force or energy; "vehement deluges of rain"; "vehement clapping"; "a vehement defense"
strong - having strength or power greater than average or expected; "a strong radio signal"; "strong medicine"; "a strong man"

vehement

vehement

adjective
Extreme in degree, strength, or effect:
Translations

vehement

[ˈviːɪmənt] ADJ [person, tone, criticism, protest] → vehemente; [denial] → rotundo, categórico; [dislike] → intenso; [attack] → violento
there was vehement oppositionhubo una fuerte or radical oposición

vehement

[ˈviːəmənt] adj [person, critic, denial, objection, protest, opposition, attack] → véhément(e)

vehement

adjvehement (geh); attack alsoheftig, scharf; critic, opponent, opposition, protestscharf; dislike, desireheftig, stark; ally, supporter, speechleidenschaftlich; to become or grow vehementheftig werden; to be vehement in one’s demands for somethingetw vehement fordern; to be vehement in one’s attack on somebody/somethingjdn/etw scharf angreifen

vehement

[ˈviːɪmənt] adj (speech, passions) → veemente, violento/a; (attack) → vigoroso/a; (dislike, hatred) → profondo/a
there was vehement opposition → ci fu una dura opposizione
References in classic literature ?
When money is to be paid and received, there is always some vehement jawing and gesticulating about it.
Mr Flintwinch had pulled him into his coat with vehement energy.
The old man was beside himself: moved the chair on which he was sitting noisily backward and forward, made efforts to control himself and not become vehement, but almost always did become vehement, scolded, and sometimes flung the exercise book away.
This, nevertheless, he almost despaired of her accepting, when he recollected the frequent and vehement assurances he had received from her, that the world put in balance with him would make her no amends for his loss.
He saw a vehement young man, powder-smeared and frowzled, whom he knew to be him.
They both have vehement wishes; they frame themselves readily into imaginations and suggestions; and they come easily into the eye, especially upon the present of the objects; which are the points that conduce to fascination, if any such thing there be.
He went back to his rooms, but they filled him with horror, he had been so wretched in them; he tried once more to read Burton's book, but, as he read, he told himself again and again what a fool he had been; it was he who had made the suggestion that they should go away, he had offered the money, he had forced it upon them; he might have known what would happen when he introduced Griffiths to Mildred; his own vehement passion was enough to arouse the other's desire.
The vehement throbbing of his heart almost suffocated him.
The scene-painter appeared to be puzzled by the vehement energy of the language addressed to him.
Although there was something very ludicrous in his vehement manner, taken in conjunction with his meagre aspect and ungraceful presence, it would scarcely have provoked a smile in any man of kindly feeling; or even if it had, he would have felt sorry and almost angry with himself next moment, for yielding to the impulse.
As long as the paralysis was upon him, and it seemed as if he might always be in a childlike condition of dependence,--as long as he was still only half awakened to his trouble,--Maggie had felt the strong tide of pitying love almost as an inspiration, a new power, that would make the most difficult life easy for his sake; but now, instead of childlike dependence, there had come a taciturn, hard concentration of purpose, in strange contrast with his old vehement communicativeness and high spirit; and this lasted from day to day, and from week to week, the dull eye never brightening with any eagerness or any joy.
Sometimes I took my vehement energy of feeling for a resolute will, and over-estimated my powers; sometimes, at the mere sight of some trifling obstacle with which I was about to come into collision, I was far more cast down than I ought to have been.