veiling


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veil·ing

 (vā′lĭng)
n.
1. A veil.
2. Sheer material, such as gauze or fine lace, used for veils.

veiling

(ˈveɪlɪŋ)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a veil or the fabric used for veils

veil•ing

(ˈveɪ lɪŋ)

n.
1. a veil.
2. a thin net for veils.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.veiling - a net of transparent fabric with a loose open weaveveiling - a net of transparent fabric with a loose open weave
cheesecloth - a coarse loosely woven cotton gauze; originally used to wrap cheeses
gossamer - a gauze fabric with an extremely fine texture
meshwork, meshing, network, mesh, net - an open fabric of string or rope or wire woven together at regular intervals
Translations

veiling

[ˈveɪlɪŋ] N (Phot) → velo m

veiling

nSchleier m; (fig: of facts, truth) → Verschleierung f
References in periodicals archive ?
Paul's rationale for veiling women is that the veil represents a sign of the authority of the man, who is the image and glory of God, over the woman who was created from and for man.
The ministry's office in Sharqeya sent a committee to investigate the forced veiling case.
This book grew out of a panel on veiling in Africa that was presented at the African Studies Association annual meeting held in San Francisco in November 2010.
England compared 122 interviews in England with 32 in France, Annelies Moors's Face veiling in the Netherlands included only about 20 interviews and Kate Ostergaard et al.
For instance, a great deal of studies examines the Islamic dress code, with a particular focus on the practice of veiling (4).
If these types of veiling are widely unpopular among European Muslims, why were they also the source of significant public debate and a key concern in European electoral campaigns?
In Amer's able hands, the often feminist, anti-colonist nature of veiling is brought to light.
In each of her five open letters, Lazreg presents different veiling or reveiling experiences, interprets them and takes issue with their justification, pointing out that the custom of "covering" should be always regarded in its historical, political, and socio-cultural context, as long as "the veil is never innocent," (p.
Yet feminist responses to veiling not only address these conflicts but also invoke debates within feminism itself about agency and victimization, as well as about racism and cultural imperialism in feminist history.
The latest trend is the birdcage veil, a cap-like hat that features Russian dotted veiling, jewels and even feathers.
Surely, when forced, only then veiling becomes repression.