velvetleaf


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Related to velvetleaf: Buttonweed, Giant Ragweed

vel·vet·leaf

 (vĕl′vĭt-lēf′)
n.
A tropical Asian annual herb (Abutilon theophrasti) that has large velvety heart-shaped leaves and yellow flowers and is cultivated in China for fiber. It is a widely naturalized weed in North America and Europe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.velvetleaf - arborescent perennial shrub having palmately lobed furry leaves and showy red-purple flowersvelvetleaf - arborescent perennial shrub having palmately lobed furry leaves and showy red-purple flowers; southwestern United States
genus Lavatera, Lavatera - widespread genus of herbs or softwood arborescent shrubs cultivated for their showy flowers
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
2.velvetleaf - tall annual herb or subshrub of tropical Asia having velvety leaves and yellow flowers and yielding a strong fibervelvetleaf - tall annual herb or subshrub of tropical Asia having velvety leaves and yellow flowers and yielding a strong fiber; naturalized in southeastern Europe and United States
mallow - any of various plants of the family Malvaceae
Abutilon, genus Abutilon - herbs or shrubs or small trees: flowering maple; Indian mallow
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, corn yield loss at low volunteer soybean densities was similar to losses reported for low densities of velvetleaf and redroot pigweed, with 10% yield loss estimated to occur at 3 to 4 volunteer soybean plants/[m.sup.2] (Alms et al., 2016).
When used specifically as a herbicide, Coleman and Penner (2008) reported that a 1.5% (v/v) pelargonic acid formulation mixed with 1% L-lactic acid (v/v) was effective in the control of velvetleaf and lambsquarters.
Compensatory responses of common cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium) and velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti) to partial shading.
[25] reported that velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medik.) was able to compete more effectively with corn in soils with a high mineralization potential.
Mainly for the control of broad-leaved weeds in corn fields, such as cocklebur, three-leaf ragweed, velvetleaf, quinoa, amaranth, Polygonum, etc., can control part of the corn field weeds.
Bonifas KD, Walters DT, Cassman KG, Lindquist JL (2005) Nitrogen supply affects root: shoot ratio in com and velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti).
Effects of nitrogen supply on the root morphology of corn and velvetleaf. Journal of Plant Nutrition, 32: 1371-1382.
Under low N availability, root growth is greater, as shown by Bonifas and Lindquist (2009) studying the effect of N supply on the morphology of corn and velvetleaf roots, as N supply decreases.
It has been proven that velvetleaf affects Sorghum bicolor and cotton as a result of the effects of Cyperusspp [1].
virescens, (ca 300 third to fifth instar larvae) was collected from velvetleaf, Abutilon theophrasti, on Wildy Farms, Leachville, MS County, AR, in September 2006, designated WF06 and imported under a Plant Health License (United Kingdom Government, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) to Imperial College London.
Estimation and Comparison of Base Temperatures for Germination of European Populations of Velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti) and Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium).