venality


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ve·nal·i·ty

 (vē-năl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. ve·nal·i·ties
1. The condition of being susceptible to bribery or corruption.
2. The use of a position of trust for dishonest gain.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.venality - prostitution of talents or offices or services for reward
corruption, corruptness - lack of integrity or honesty (especially susceptibility to bribery); use of a position of trust for dishonest gain
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

venality

[viːˈnælɪtɪ] Nvenalidad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

venality

n (liter) (of person)Käuflichkeit f; (of practices)Korruption f; the venality of his interestsseine eigennützigen Motive
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

venality

[viːˈnælɪtɪ] n (frm) → venalità
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
This peculiar felicity of situation has, in a great degree, contributed to preserve the liberty which that country to this day enjoys, in spite of the prevalent venality and corruption.
The doctor's alarms, his unscrupulous venality, the simulated illness, my own dismissal, each fitted in its obvious place, and not even the last had power as yet to mar my joy in the one central fact to which all the rest were as tapers to the sun.
Lines 573-88 of Venality may give an idea of Sir Brooke's style:
It is a vision often endangered in such plays as The Crucible and All My Sons by the venality of human nature, but it remained the source of hope.
For the conflation of fashionability and venality, on the 'assumption that a woman would take off her clothes in order to have nice clothes' (p.60), tells us much about both particular paintings and their reception.
They include El hombre de hierro (1907), which depicts the triumph of evil over virtue; El hombre de oro (The Man of Gold, 1916), which exposes the venality and incompetence of Venezuelan politicians; and La mitra en la mano (1927), the story of an ambitious priest, a character that has been called a Venezuelan Elmer Gantry.
They include El hombre de hierro (1907), which depicts the triumph of evil over virtue; El hombre de oro ( The Man of Gold, 1916), which exposes the venality and incompetence of Venezuelan politicians; and La mitra en la mano (1927), the story of an ambitious priest, a character that has been called a Venezuelan Elmer Gantry.
Indeed, the recent crisis in the National Assembly is a stark reminder that can escalate to the collapse of democratic institutions and in the recent past in our national memories has been the telling of pain, poverty, brutality, murder, mass extinction, every form of venality and cyclical horror ever imagined in our nation building efforts.
The venality, shortsightedness and idiocy which drove the banking meltdown rightly fascinates, as demonstrated by the success of the film The Big Short.
Although officially keeping silent, party sources say the lower structures of the party are closely following the information media report about the alleged venality of their party leaders.
Confronted with implacable venality and corruption in the ruling Congress-led United Progressive Alliance, it has soldiered on to demand better governance and policies, all the while biding its time for when it could deal the cankerous polity a fatal blow.