venerative

venerative

(ˈvɛnərətɪv)
adj
of or relating to veneration or worship
ˈvenerativeness n
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the impulse to attribute some consequential import to every clause of the Constitution arises from the same sorts of venerative attitudes animating the idea that there is meaning to be found in every single word of the Bible, the Koran, and similar religious texts.
15) His thoughts were essentially what Robert Penn Warren had avowed in the more comfortably racist and openly Booker Washington venerative essay, "The Briar Patch," in 1931.
But it is the icons themselves that generate the most powerful emotional responses; take, for example, the soft, venerative calm emanating from the seventeenth-century panel Thomas the Apostle.
And even if we can be certain of what actually happened, how certain can we be that venerative actions correlated to acceptance of Jesus as God?
Stuckenbruck gives a detailed discussion of ancient Jewish venerative attitudes and expressions directed toward angels, with a focus on how ancient Jews combined a reverential stance toward angels with a monotheistic commitment.
He regards the term 'monotheism' as a 'conceptually useful' term for ancient Jewish tradition, provided that we allow for the way 'strict monotheistic claims could be coupled with venerative language associated with other beings' (p.
After the Brown decision, southerners rallied to defend the threatened color line, racial demagogues found large and venerative audiences, and southern unionists no longer ignored their leaders' criticism of segregation, as they had in the past.