arrhythmia

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Related to ventricular arrhythmia: ventricular fibrillation, atrial arrhythmia, Ventricular tachycardia

ar·rhyth·mi·a

 (ə-rĭth′mē-ə)
n.
1. An irregularity in the force or rhythm of the heartbeat: a fatal arrhythmia.
2. A condition characterized by such irregularities: treatments for cardiac arrhythmia.

[New Latin, from Greek arruthmiā, lack of rhythm, from arruthmos, unrhythmical : a-, without; see a-1 + rhuthmos, rhythm; see rhythm.]

arrhythmia

,

arhythmia

or

arythmia

n
(Pathology) any variation from the normal rhythm in the heartbeat. Also called: dysrhythmia
[C19: New Latin, from Greek arrhuthmia, from a-1 + rhuthmos rhythm]

ar•rhyth•mi•a

(əˈrɪð mi ə, eɪˈrɪð-)

n.
any disturbance in the rhythm of the heartbeat.
[1885–90; < Greek arrhythmía. See a-6, rhythm]
ar•rhyth′mic, ar•rhyth′mi•cal, adj.
ar•rhyth′mi•cal•ly, adv.

ar·rhyth·mi·a

(ə-rĭth′mē-ə)
An abnormal rhythm of the heart.

arrhythmia, arhythmia, arythmia, arrythmia

any abnormality in the rhythm of the heartbeat. — arrhythmic, arhythmic, arythmic, arrythmic, adj.
See also: Heart

arrhythmia

Abnormal heart rate or rhythm: tachycardia (faster than normal heart rate) and bradycardia (slower than normal heart rate). It is caused by a disruption of the heart’s conduction system, which generates and transmits electrical impulses in the heart. It can be caused by coronary artery disease, stress, exertion, or some drugs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arrhythmia - an abnormal rate of muscle contractions in the heartarrhythmia - an abnormal rate of muscle contractions in the heart
cardiopathy, heart disease - a disease of the heart
flutter - abnormally rapid beating of the auricles of the heart (especially in a regular rhythm); can result in heart block
cantering rhythm, gallop rhythm - cardiac rhythm characterized by the presence of an extra sound; can indicate a heart abnormality
atrial fibrillation - fibrillation of the muscles of the atria of the heart
bradycardia - abnormally slow heartbeat
Adams-Stokes syndrome, atrioventricular block, heart block, Stokes-Adams syndrome - recurrent sudden attacks of unconsciousness caused by impaired conduction of the impulse that regulates the heartbeat
premature ventricular contraction, PVC - irregularity of cardiac rhythm; recurrent occurrences can be a precursor of ventricular fibrillation
tachycardia - abnormally rapid heartbeat (over 100 beats per minute)
ventricular fibrillation - fibrillation of heart muscles resulting in interference with rhythmic contractions of the ventricles and possibly leading to cardiac arrest
Translations

arrhythmia

n (Med) → Arrhythmie f

arrhythmia

[əˈrɪðmɪə] naritmia

ar·rhyth·mi·a

n. arritmia, falta de ritmo, esp. latidos irregulares del corazón.

arrhythmia

n arritmia
References in periodicals archive ?
The primary end point was a composite of cardiac death, stroke, reinfarction, ventricular arrhythmia, or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation within 1 month.
Continuous telemetric monitoring showed no ventricular arrhythmia, an echocardiogram showed normal left ventricular size and normal systolic function, and a nuclear myocardial perfusion study showed a large perfusion defect involving the inferior and inferolateral walls, a mixture of infarction and ischemia.
DelveInsight's, Ventricular Arrhythmia -API Insights, 2014 Report describes the current therapeutics that are propelling the pharmaceutical markets worldwide.
Bradycardia (slow heart rates) occurred more frequently than ventricular tachycardia (abnormal and dangerous rapid or chaotic heart rhythms): In the study, 19 of 50 patients had at least one bradycardia episode (with a rate of 26 bradycardia events per patient month); there were only two sustained ventricular arrhythmia episodes during the follow-up.
Clayton's heart rhythm back to normal if he has another episode of ventricular arrhythmia, that rapid, unstable and irregular rhythm that caused him to undergo cardiac arrest.
It will test whether patients with a primary prevention indication for an ICD and one or more additional risk factors have the same risk of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia as patients who have survived a prior episode of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia and are indicated for an ICD for secondary prevention of SCA
Ventricular arrhythmia risk can be assessed using signal averaged electrocardiography (SAECG) and 12-lead ECG.
Stevenson also highlighted the growing availability of catheter ablation for ventricular arrhythmia.
Some endurance athletes can develop ventricular arrhythmia (VA), which causes the heart to beat at an abnormal rhythm.
The Triggers of Ventricular Arrhythmia (TOVA) study was done at seven centers in the United States.
In this study, event was defined as any ventricular arrhythmia recorded on the ICD.