verb phrase

(redirected from verb phrases)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

verb phrase

n. Abbr. VP
1. A phrase consisting of a verb and its auxiliaries, as should be done in the sentence The students should be done with the exam by noon.
2. A phrase consisting of a verb, its auxiliaries, its complements, and other modifiers, as should be done with the exam by noon in the sentence The students should be done with the exam by noon.

verb phrase

n
(Grammar) grammar a constituent of a sentence that contains the verb and any direct and indirect objects but not the subject. It is a controversial question in grammatical theory whether or not this constituent is to be identified with the predicate of the sentence. Abbreviation: VP
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.verb phrase - one of the two main constituents of a sentence; the predicate contains the verb and its complements
phrase - an expression consisting of one or more words forming a grammatical constituent of a sentence
Translations
syntagme verbal
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, it needs to be noted that primary verb phrases, though certainly idiomatic to some degree, are far more free and compositional than the prototypical phraseological idioms, which is proved by their greater syntactic freedom, greater compositionality and lesser internal frozenness.
They are part of a continuum of verb-like nouns; the continuum ranges from (1) genuine nouns that just happen to look exactly like verbs, to (2) well-established nouns that are being given a new, computer-related meaning, to (3) recently constructed nouns that until about ten minutes ago were verbs only, to (4) very recently constructed noun phrases that used to be verb phrases. These verb phrases included direct objects, indirect objects, prepositions, declarations, intimations, insinuations--anything that happened to appear on a user interface spelled out in English letters.
should have studied will be driving must have been grilled Verb phrases are very common.
Wilson (Pasadena City College) and the late Glazier (Western Illinois U.) cover word choice and spelling, including parts of speech, contractions and possessives; sentence structure, including prepositional phrases, fragments, verb phrases, run-on sentences, and parallel structure; punctuation and capital letters; and writing, including the basic structure of the paragraph and essay, organizing ideas and revising.
Remember to check for verb phrases and to ignore all adverbs except not.
Drawing on speech-related and non-speech-related written genres, he also discusses methodological issues; correlations between the use of the progressive with the extra-linguistic features of the time, genre, and the sex of the language user; details of progressive verb phrases; and the kinds of linguistic features that co-occur with the construction, and how these features affect language users' interpretation of a given progressive.
The next example consists of three serial verb phrases and exhibits an A-A-S sequence.
As we saw in Chapter 18, many sentences contain verb phrases, that is, two or more words acting as one.
Besides negating verb phrases and verbs, as shown in (23) and (24), respectively, bu can also negate adjectives (cf.
He covers grounding: a literature review, grammatical features of Chinese and previous grounding analysis, at the verb phrase core: foregrounding through bounding, in single-verb clauses: constituent order and grounding, in complex predicates: grounding of verb phrases, in complex sentences: margins versus nucleus, coercion in semantic and aspectual reinterpretation, and the foregrounding function of jiu.
In other words, the errors in these verb phrases are in the same category as the one in cannot*lay.
When does the author use compound or complex sentences with extended noun or verb phrases? How does this choice effect the reader and text?