verbal noun


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verbal noun

n.
A noun that is derived from a verb and usually preserves the verb's syntactic features, such as transitivity or the capability of taking nominal or verbal complements.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

verbal noun

n
(Grammar) a noun derived from a verb, such as smoking in the sentence smoking is bad for you. See also gerund
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ver′bal noun′


n.
a noun derived from a verb, esp. by a regular process, as the -ing form in Smoking is forbidden.
[1700–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.verbal noun - a noun that is derived from a verb
gerund - a noun formed from a verb (such as the `-ing' form of an English verb when used as a noun)
common noun - a noun that denotes any or all members of a class
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
podstatné jméno slovesné
VerbalnomenVerbalsubstantiv
rzeczownik odczasownikowy

verbal noun

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
In its only attestation the verbal noun zammurai- is modified by KAxU-i 'mouth', and so the translation 'slander' seems appropriate:
?ay handiri ?a-?n ize 'I dreamed of my son' (verb handiri) ?a-?n handiri 'my dream' (verbal noun handiri) Verbal nouns of Low-tone monosyllabic verbs change their tone to Falling.
It consists of the verbal noun ol 'drinking' (in its most general sense) plus the prepositional prefix ad-, ath, used in the formation of compound nouns.
Notwithstanding that it is shown as a second alternative to "Datganli", a verbal noun, in the Welsh Academy's English-Welsh Dictionary, it has gained no currency.
2) Noun + Verbal Noun: In English there are terms the nucleus of which is expressed by a verbal noun naming the operation being done, while the determinant specifies the latter, indicating a) what material is used for the operation: board lining--lentu apkalas, timber boarding--apkalimas lentomis, vapour cooling--ausinimas garu, wood flooring--medines grindys; b) where or to which part of the building the operation or activity is applied: ceiling heating--lubinis sildymas, indoor lighting--vidaus apsvietimas, leak/leakage testing--sandarumo tikrinimas, pipe cleaning--vamzdziu valymas, roof loading--stogo apkrovimas, sieve testing--granuliometrine analize, underfloor heating--pogrindinis sildymas.
74 contributes "In the [following, charted] verbal noun forms, the e vowel of the stem (of the infinitive, future and imperative) is deleted." On p.
T E S S E R A T E D tesserated, see OED tesserate D E S S E M B L E D see below E L T A M A R A N I Wadi el-Tamarani, Egypt, 29[degrees] 52' N, 34 [degrees] 32' E, NIMA S T I T C H I N G S stitching, OED verbal noun, or plural in 3 quotes S A T I R E T T E S satirette, OED, plural in quote E M C R I S T E N E OED wosith, first quote (and 6 others elsewhere) M A H E S W A R D I Nagar Maheswardi, Bangladesh, 24[degrees] 04' N, 90[degrees] 42' E, NIMA B R I T T A I N E S Britains or British, see OED symbolize, 1590 quote etc.
The discussion reveals that the infinitive "be" (which is the basis of the verbal noun "be [-ing]") "names something that lies at the foundation of all inflections of the verb" (p.
They noted also that the Latin gerund or verbal noun `referendum' (a bringing or taking back) is not declined and has no plural.
Something of a concrete vertical hierarchy is implied in this Arabic verbal noun, which is not necessarily present in the English word "revelation." (2)
The majority of the words in the analyzed set of vocabulary are nouns, but--in so far as my etymological inferences prove to be true--there are some suffixes that are added to verbal stems (furthermore, in some cases, the UEW provides a verbal noun as a starting point).
b) In Old Irish, Agents are usually formed with the suffix -(a)id/-(a)ith added to a verbal noun, as shown by cetlaid 'singer' (from cetal 'singing'), scribndid 'writer' (from scribend 'writing'), etc.