verbalism


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Related to verbalism: verbalist

ver·bal·ism

 (vûr′bə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. An expression in words; a word or phrase.
b. The manner in which something is phrased; wording.
2. A wordy phrase or sentence that has little meaning.
3. Abundant use of words without conveying much meaning.

verbalism

(ˈvɜːbəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. a verbal expression; phrase or word
2. an exaggerated emphasis on the importance of words by the uncritical acceptance of assertions in place of explanations, the use of rhetorical style, etc
3. a statement lacking real content, esp a cliché

ver•bal•ism

(ˈvɜr bəˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. a verbal expression, as a word or phrase.
2. a phrase or sentence having little or no meaning.
3. a use of words considered as obscuring ideas or facts; verbiage.
[1780–90]

verbalism

1. a verbal expression, as a word or phrase.
2. the way in which something is worded.
3. a phrase or sentence devoid or almost devoid of meaning.
4. a use of words regarded as obscuring ideas or reality; verbiage.
See also: Language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.verbalism - the communication (in speech or writing) of your beliefs or opinions; "expressions of good will"; "he helped me find verbal expression for my ideas"; "the idea was immediate but the verbalism took hours"
communicating, communication - the activity of communicating; the activity of conveying information; "they could not act without official communication from Moscow"
articulation, voice - expressing in coherent verbal form; "the articulation of my feelings"; "I gave voice to my feelings"
cold turkey - a blunt expression of views; "I told him cold turkey"
felicitation, congratulation - (usually plural) an expression of pleasure at the success or good fortune of another; "I sent them my sincere congratulations on their marriage"
2.verbalism - overabundance of wordsverbalism - overabundance of words    
verboseness, verbosity - an expressive style that uses excessive or empty words

verbalism

noun
Choice of words and the way in which they are used:
References in classic literature ?
I will not weary you with the verbalism, since you will be able to check it; the substance of my proclamation is this: I announce first that I have captured the English millionaire, the colossus of finance, Mr Samuel Harrogate.
This idea of female silence links to the backlash against feminist verbalism which is adequately summed up in Bruno Bettelheim's chauvinistic assumption that "While many fairy tales stress great deeds the heroes must perform to become themselves, Sleeping Beauty emphasizes the long, quiet concentration on oneself that is also needed [.
Speaking on Sigma TV on Sunday night, Theocharous had her own name-calling bout, with "nonsense, verbalism and irresponsibility" being just some of the epithets she used to describe Venizelos' tirade.
This book sets out to introduce key ideas and concepts, examining meaning not in an Aristotelian sense (or in the many theories of meaning following from Aristotle) couched in abstract verbalism and referents.
To prohibit no other would place the inventor at the mercy of verbalism and would be subordinating substance to form.
How easily we can fall into hyprocrisy and even verbalism.
It was, in all" claims Agyeman "a spirited performance that left the objective of a Union Government bleeding to death on the floor of the Cairo conference hall, speared, as it were, by Nyerere's flashing verbalism.
When the action of teaching practice--the actual context of practice--is removed, the student of teaching is confronted with theoretical verbalism.
Professor Ackerman extends the argument, accusing Senator Brown of a "clever verbalism.