verbally


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ver·bal

 (vûr′bəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or associated with words: a detailed verbal description.
2.
a. Concerned with words only rather than with content or ideas: a merely verbal distinction.
b. Consisting of words alone without action: a verbal confrontation.
3. Expressed in spoken rather than written words; oral: a verbal contract.
4. Corresponding word for word; literal: a verbal translation.
5. Grammar
a. Relating to, having the nature or function of, or derived from a verb.
b. Used to form verbs: a verbal suffix.
6. Of or relating to proficiency in the use and understanding of words: a verbal aptitude test.
n. Grammar
A verbal noun or adjective.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin verbālis, from Latin verbum, word; see verb.]

ver′bal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.verbally - as a verb; "he had a habit of using nouns verbally"
2.verbally - by means of language; "verbally expressive"

verbally

adverb orally, vocally, in words, in speech, by word of mouth He has difficulty expressing himself verbally.
Translations
كلاميّا
slovně
mundtligt
élõszóban
munnlega
slovne
sözlü olarak

verbally

[ˈvɜːbəlɪ] ADV [communicate, abuse] → verbalmente; [agree] → de palabra

verbally

[ˈvɜːrbəli] advverbalement

verbally

adv
(= spoken)mündlich, verbal; threatenverbal; to verbally abuse somebodyjdn beschimpfen; verbally abusiveausfällig
(= as a verb)verbal

verbally

[ˈvɜːbəlɪ] adva voce, verbalmente

verb

(vəːb) noun
the word or phrase that gives the action, or asserts something, in a sentence, clause etc. I saw him; He ran away from me; I have a feeling; What is this?
ˈverbal adjective
1. of, or concerning, verbs. verbal endings such as `-fy', `-ize'.
2. consisting of, or concerning, spoken words. a verbal warning/agreement.
ˈverbally adverb
in or by speech, not writing. I replied to the invitation verbally.
verbatim (-ˈbeitim) adjective, adverb
word for word. a verbatim report of the argument; The child repeated my words verbatim.
verbose (-ˈbous) adjective
using too many words; expressed in too many words. a verbose speaker; a verbose description/style.
References in classic literature ?
For all these reasons then, and others perhaps too analytic to be verbally developed here, Ahab plainly saw that he must still in a good degree continue true to the natural, nominal purpose of the Pequod's voyage; observe all customary usages; and not only that, but force himself to evince all his well known passionate interest in the general pursuit of his profession.
As long as it is her interest to provide herself with pecuniary resources for the future, she verbally engages to go on.
Beginning with the battle of Borodino, from which time his disagreement with those about him began, he alone said that the battle of Borodino was a victory, and repeated this both verbally and in his dispatches and reports up to the time of his death.
But if these suspicions were really his, he sagaciously refrained from verbally expressing them, however his actions might seem to hint them.
le Prince at first gave me the message verbally, but upon reflection his highness took up his pen.
Mr Dorrit's gratification was such that he said--ha--he could not refrain from telling Mr Merdle verbally, as he had already done by letter, what honour and happiness he felt in this union of their families.
Therefore, and because she was a dependent, Miss Monflathers had a great dislike to Miss Edwards, and was spiteful to her, and aggravated by her, and, when she had compassion on little Nell, verbally fell upon and maltreated her as we have already seen.
Again Mrs Sliderskew chuckled, but modesty forbade her assenting verbally to the compliment.
In so doing he makes relentless use of the intellect and of verbally precise but actually preposterous logic, striking out astonishingly brilliant but utterly fantastic flashes of wit.
Chadband's being much given to describe himself, both verbally and in writing, as a vessel, he is occasionally mistaken by strangers for a gentleman connected with navigation, but he is, as he expresses it, "in the ministry.
I have contradicted it, sir," Fred answered, with a touch of impatience, not remembering that his uncle did not verbally discriminate contradicting from disproving, though no one was further from confounding the two ideas than old Featherstone, who often wondered that so many fools took his own assertions for proofs.
On some points, as soon as the decision was made, the law was issued verbally on the spot.