verbicide

verbicide

(ˈvɜːbɪˌsaɪd)
n
an act or instance of destroying a word
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

verbicide

Facetious. misuse or overuse of a word or any use of a word which is damaging to it.
See also: Language
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Interview: Diane di Prima." Verbicide, 29 July 2010, www.verbicidemagazine.com/2010/07/29/interview-diane-di-prima.
It's enough to drive an anxious magazine editor to verbicide.
My argument against Hitchings's use of intriguing is on two grounds: First, it is an act of verbicide, for if more and more people use the word as he does, its older, more specific meaning will soon pass out of existence, which would be both a loss and a pity.
In this piece on Screwtape's "Verbicide," he underscores affinities between Lewis (Screwtape), Tolkien (Saruman), and Orwell (Newspeak) on the modern corruption of language to obfuscate rather than communicate, with corrupted language ultimately becoming a force for evil ("humans can easily be led to do what they know to be wrong in the service of a cause they believe to be right").
Kofi Annan is not the first to push this subversion through verbicide; he is, in fact, merely echoing what a long train of globalists have been advocating for many decades.
You mention as a source the article "Verbicide" by David Orr in the August 1999 issue of the journal Conservation Biology.
In all fairness, the law is not the only business to succumb to what the British linguist, Geoffrey Hughes, aptly called "verbicide and semantic engineering." The medical, advertising, and computer trades have done so with comparable aplomb, and governments are notorious for coming up with new words which are designed to communicate, but ultimately achieve the opposite result.
"Verbicide and Menticide," "Variations on a Faustian Theme," "Symbol, Image and Perception," "Inspiration," "When the Game Is Over," "Danse Macabre," "To Whom It May Concern," "An Ode to Oblivion," and several others end this extraordinary collection of thoughtful and thought- and emotion-provoking poetry.