verbose


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ver·bose

 (vər-bōs′)
adj.
Using or containing a great and usually an excessive number of words; wordy. See Synonyms at wordy.

[Middle English *verbous, from Latin verbōsus, from verbum, word; see verb.]

ver·bose′ly adv.
ver·bose′ness, ver·bos′i·ty (-bŏs′ĭ-tē) n.

verbose

(vɜːˈbəʊs)
adj
using or containing an excess of words, so as to be pedantic or boring; prolix
[C17: from Latin verbōsus from verbum word]
verˈbosely adv
verbosity, verˈboseness n

ver•bose

(vərˈboʊs)

adj.
expressed in or characterized by the use of many or too many words; wordy: a verbose report; a verbose speaker.
[1665–75; < Latin verbōsus=verb(um) word + -ōsus -ose1]
ver•bose′ly, adv.
ver•bos′i•ty (-ˈbɒs ɪ ti) ver•bose′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.verbose - using or containing too many wordsverbose - using or containing too many words; "long-winded (or windy) speakers"; "verbose and ineffective instructional methods"; "newspapers of the day printed long wordy editorials"; "proceedings were delayed by wordy disputes"
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"

verbose

verbose

adjective
Using or containing an excessive number of words:
Translations
كَثير الحَشْو بالكَلام
upovídaný
ordrig
bőbeszédűfecsegőszószátyár
冗長な
táravý
ağzı kalabalıkgereksiz sözlerle dolu

verbose

[vɜːˈbəʊs] ADJ [person] → verboso, hablador; [writing, style] → prolijo, verboso

verbose

[vɜːrˈbəʊs] adjverbeux/euse

verbose

[vɜːˈbəʊs] adjverboso/a, prolisso/a

verb

(vəːb) noun
the word or phrase that gives the action, or asserts something, in a sentence, clause etc. I saw him; He ran away from me; I have a feeling; What is this?
ˈverbal adjective
1. of, or concerning, verbs. verbal endings such as `-fy', `-ize'.
2. consisting of, or concerning, spoken words. a verbal warning/agreement.
ˈverbally adverb
in or by speech, not writing. I replied to the invitation verbally.
verbatim (-ˈbeitim) adjective, adverb
word for word. a verbatim report of the argument; The child repeated my words verbatim.
verbose (-ˈbous) adjective
using too many words; expressed in too many words. a verbose speaker; a verbose description/style.
References in classic literature ?
But I thought that was perhaps no more than a natural reserve accentuated by the verbose frankness of her husband.
Levin smiled joyfully; he was struck by this transition from the confused, verbose discussion with Pestsov and his brother to this laconic, clear, almost wordless communication of the most complex ideas.
He strode down the stairs with tingling pulses, and drove to the House, where his speech, a little florid in its rhetoric, and verbose as became the man, was nevertheless a great success.
What he had to say was confused, halting, and verbose; but Philip knew the words which served as the text of his rambling discourse.
"I must confess," she continued, "that if I had known how many classics there are in English literature, and how verbose the best of them contrive to be, I should never have undertaken the work.
Chadband's piling verbose flights of stairs, one upon another, after this fashion.
Too many laws were "Gold Plated", like the latest verbose Data Protection Act, which was far more restrictive and interfering than the original EU GDPR, targeted at large companies using sensitive data, not modest traders, clubs, and Christmas card lists.
In turn, commission member Sandis Riekstins (New Conservative Party) said that the ministry's answers were too verbose, which would not make the commission's work any easier.
Especially with the verbose language of the mortgage industry, there's a clear need for materials that accommodate native Spanish speakers.
The DFA chief also said the terms of Beijing was "more faithful" than Manila's "verbose version" that he rejected.
Gyles Brandreth watching Love Island with veteran actress Sheila Hancock, Nick Grimshaw and his niece Liv screaming at the end of Fatal Attraction and verbose boxer Chris Eubank rendered speechless by the sight of Nigella Lawson in a pair of rubber gloves black rubbbbbbb er caressing frozen peas.
Under the 2007 rules of the National Assembly, a speaker can ban a word, phrase, or an expression if it is considered too "argumentative, unparliamentary, ironical, irrelevant, verbose or otherwise inappropriate".