verisimilitude


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ver·i·si·mil·i·tude

 (vĕr′ə-sĭ-mĭl′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1. The quality of appearing to be true or real: "The painting owes its verisimilitude to a number of groundbreaking innovations. Its life-size figures are rendered with a new kind of sculptural modeling, which makes them seem to occupy real space" (Jack Flam). See Synonyms at truth.
2. Something that has the appearance of being true or real.

[Latin vērīsimilitūdō, from vērīsimilis, verisimilar; see verisimilar.]

ver′i·si·mil′i·tu′di·nous (-to͞od′n-əs, -tyo͞od′-) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

verisimilitude

(ˌvɛrɪsɪˈmɪlɪˌtjuːd) or

verisimility

n
1. the appearance or semblance of truth or reality; quality of seeming true
2. something that merely seems to be true or real, such as a doubtful statement
[C17: from Latin vērisimilitūdō, from vērus true + similitūdō similitude]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ver•i•si•mil•i•tude

(ˌvɛr ə sɪˈmɪl ɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. the appearance or semblance of truth; likelihood.
2. something, as an assertion, having merely the appearance of truth.
[1595–1605; < Latin vērīsimilitūdō=vērī, genitive singular of vērum truth + similitūdō similitude]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.verisimilitude - the appearance of truthverisimilitude - the appearance of truth; the quality of seeming to be true
semblance, gloss, color, colour - an outward or token appearance or form that is deliberately misleading; "he hoped his claims would have a semblance of authenticity"; "he tried to give his falsehood the gloss of moral sanction"; "the situation soon took on a different color"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

verisimilitude

noun realism, authenticity, credibility, resemblance, likeness, semblance, plausibility, likeliness Computer animation is costly at this level of visual verisimilitude.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

verisimilitude

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

verisimilitude

[ˌverɪsɪˈmɪlɪtjuːd] Nverosimilitud f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

verisimilitude

[ˌvɛrɪsɪˈmɪlɪtjuːd] n (= authenticity) → vraisemblance f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

verisimilitude

n (form)Wahrhaftigkeit f (liter), → Echtheit f; (of theory)Plausibilität f, → Evidenz f (liter)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

verisimilitude

[ˌvɛrɪsɪˈmɪlɪˌtjuːd] n (frm) → verosimiglianza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The play on his name which was made by his contemporary Herodicus, "thou wast ever bold in battle," seems to show that the description of him is not devoid of verisimilitude.
Plots in fiction should be wedded to the understanding of the reader, and be constructed in such a way that, reconciling impossibilities, smoothing over difficulties, keeping the mind on the alert, they may surprise, interest, divert, and entertain, so that wonder and delight joined may keep pace one with the other; all which he will fail to effect who shuns verisimilitude and truth to nature, wherein lies the perfection of writing.
At last, satisfactorily disguised, and with even his shock of black hair adding to the verisimilitude of his likeness to the natives of the city, he sought for some means of reaching the street below.
'Lovely it was,' went on Maud, dully conscious of failure, but stippling in like an artist the little touches which give atmosphere and verisimilitude to a story.
That was the essence of his vision - which was all rank folly, if one would, while he was out of the house and otherwise occupied, but which took on the last verisimilitude as soon as he was placed and posted.
The character of the publication, the general verisimilitude of the news, the consideration of the motive, and so on.
All those minute circumstances belonging to private life and domestic character, all that gives verisimilitude to a narrative, and individuality to the persons introduced, is still known and remembered in Scotland; whereas in England, civilisation has been so long complete, that our ideas of our ancestors are only to be gleaned from musty records and chronicles, the authors of which seem perversely to have conspired to suppress in their narratives all interesting details, in order to find room for flowers of monkish eloquence, or trite reflections upon morals.
Its tales of the Ethiopian Prester John, of diamonds that by proper care can be made to grow, of trees whose fruit is an odd sort of lambs, and a hundred other equally remarkable phenomena, are narrated with skilful verisimilitude and still strongly hold the reader's interest, even if they no longer command belief.
If one has a taste for that kind of thing the merest starting-point becomes a coign of vantage, and then by a series of logically deducted verisimilitudes one arrives at truth--or very near the truth--as near as any circumstantial evidence can do.
But lest those who are ignorant of the force of mathematical demonstrations and who are not accustomed to distinguish true reasons from mere verisimilitudes, should venture.
Synopsis: "Machado de Assis and Narrative Theory: Language, Imitation, Art, and Verisimilitude in the Last Six Novels" by Earl E.
In 'Verisimilitude', three bamboo trees in Chinese art symbolise life, health and wealth while the flower which, according to Chinese legend blooms once in 60 to 100 years, depicts the end of life.