vernacular

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ver·nac·u·lar

 (vər-năk′yə-lər)
n.
1.
a. The everyday language spoken by a people as distinguished from the literary language.
b. A variety of such everyday language specific to a social group or region: the vernaculars of New York City.
2. The specialized vocabulary of a particular trade, profession, or group: in the legal vernacular.
3. The common, nonscientific name of a plant or animal.
adj.
1. Native to or commonly spoken by the members of a particular country or region.
2. Using the native language of a region, especially as distinct from the literary language: a vernacular poet.
3. Relating to or expressed in the native language or dialect.
4. Of or being an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament, especially as distinguished from academic or historical architectural styles.
5. Occurring or existing in a particular locality; endemic: a vernacular disease.
6. Relating to or designating the common, nonscientific name of a biological species.

[From Latin vernāculus, native, from verna, native slave, perhaps of Etruscan origin.]

ver·nac′u·lar·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vernacular

(vəˈnækjʊlə)
n
1. (Linguistics) the vernacular the commonly spoken language or dialect of a particular people or place
2. (Architecture) a local style of architecture, in which ordinary houses are built: this architect has re-created a true English vernacular.
adj
3. relating to, using, or in the vernacular
4. (Biology) designating or relating to the common name of an animal or plant
5. (Architecture) built in the local style of ordinary houses, rather than a grand architectural style
[C17: from Latin vernāculus belonging to a household slave, from verna household slave]
verˈnacularly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ver•nac•u•lar

(vərˈnæk yə lər, vəˈnæk-)

adj.
1. (of language) native or indigenous (opposed to literary or learned).
2. expressed or written in the native language of a place.
3. of, pertaining to, or using such a language.
4. using plain, everyday language.
5. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of architectural vernacular.
6. of or pertaining to the common name for a plant, animal, or other organism.
n.
7. the native speech or language of a place.
8. the distinctive vocabulary of a class or profession.
9. the plain variety of language in everyday use by ordinary people.
10. the common name of a plant, animal, or other organism as distinguished from its Latin scientific name.
11. a style of architecture exemplifying the commonest techniques, decorative features, and materials of a particular historical period, region, or group of people.
[1595–1605; < Latin vernācul(us) household, domestic, native]
ver•nac′u•lar•ly, adv.
syn: See language.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

vernacular

Used to describe the everyday language used by ordinary people.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vernacular - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
bite - a portion removed from the whole; "the government's weekly bite from my paycheck"
swiz - British slang for a swindle
heist, rip-off - the act of stealing
shakedown - extortion of money (as by blackmail)
power trip - (slang) a self-aggrandizing action undertaken simply for the pleasure of exercising control over other people
nookie, nooky, piece of tail, roll in the hay, screwing, screw - slang for sexual intercourse
hand job - slang for masturbation
dekko - British slang for a look
square-bashing - drill on a barracks square
shakedown - a very thorough search of a person or a place; "a shakedown by the police uncovered the drugs"
caff - informal British term for a cafe
deck - street name for a packet of illegal drugs
gat, rod - a gangster's pistol
Mickey Finn - slang term for knockout drops
nick - (British slang) a prison; "he's in the nick"
dreck, schlock, shlock - merchandise that is shoddy or inferior
cert - an absolute certainty; "it's a dead cert"
legs - staying power; "that old Broadway play really has legs"
soup-strainer, toothbrush - slang for a mustache
bunghole - vulgar slang for anus
bay window, potbelly, tummy, corporation, pot - slang for a paunch
niff, pong - an unpleasant smell
street name - slang for something (especially for an illegal drug); "`smack' is a street name for heroin"
corker - (dated slang) a remarkable or excellent thing or person; "that story was a corker"
hooey, poppycock, stuff and nonsense, stuff - senseless talk; "don't give me that stuff"
baloney, bilgewater, boloney, bosh, drool, humbug, tommyrot, tosh, twaddle, taradiddle, tarradiddle - pretentious or silly talk or writing
codswallop, folderol, trumpery, wish-wash, applesauce, tripe, rubbish, trash - nonsensical talk or writing
skin flick - a pornographic movie
dibs - a claim of rights; "I have dibs on that last slice of pizza"
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
rhyming slang - slang that replaces words with rhyming words or expressions and then typically omits the rhyming component; "Cockney rhyming slang"
bunfight, bun-fight - (Briticism) a grand formal party on an important occasion
burnup - a high-speed motorcycle race on a public road
nosh-up - a large satisfying meal
hood - (slang) a neighborhood
'hood - (slang) a neighborhood
paleface - (slang) a derogatory term for a white person (supposedly used by North American Indians)
white trash - (slang) an offensive term for White people who are impoverished
whitey - (slang) offensive names for a White man
slant-eye - (slang) a disparaging term for an Asian person (especially for North Vietnamese soldiers in the Vietnam War)
Injun, red man, Redskin - (slang) offensive term for Native Americans
sheeny - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Jew
ginzo, greaseball, Guinea - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Italian descent
Jap, Nip - (offensive slang) offensive term for a person of Japanese descent
spic, spik - (ethnic slur) offensive term for persons of Latin American descent
Boche, Jerry, Kraut, Krauthead, Hun - offensive term for a person of German descent
airhead - a flighty scatterbrained simpleton; "she's a total airhead"; "every airhead on a big salary rushed out to buy one"
babe, sister, baby - (slang) sometimes used as a term of address for attractive young women
bad egg - (old-fashioned slang) a bad person
boffin - (British slang) a scientist or technician engaged in military research
good egg - (old-fashioned slang) a good person
guvnor - (British slang) boss
old man - (slang) boss
out-and-outer - someone who is excellent at something
2.vernacular - the everyday speech of the people (as distinguished from literary language)
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
Adj.1.vernacular - being or characteristic of or appropriate to everyday language; "common parlance"; "a vernacular term"; "vernacular speakers"; "the vulgar tongue of the masses"; "the technical and vulgar names for an animal species"
informal - used of spoken and written language
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

vernacular

noun
1. speech, jargon, idiom, parlance, cant, native language, dialect, patois, argot, vulgar tongue To use the vernacular of the day, Peter was square.
adjective
1. colloquial, popular, informal, local, common, native, indigenous, vulgar dialects such as black vernacular English
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

vernacular

noun
1. A system of terms used by a people sharing a history and culture:
Linguistics: langue.
2. A variety of a language that differs from the standard form:
3. Specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
لُغَة دارِجَهلُغَة عامِيَّه ، لُغَة مَحْكِيَّه
hovorovýnářečí
dagligdags sprogdialekt
nemzeti nyelvnépnyelvi
òjóîtunga; mál alòÿîunnar
vietinė kalba
dzimtaismātes-vietējā valoda/dialektsvietējais
halk dilihalk dilindeyerli lehçeyerli lehçede

vernacular

[vəˈnækjʊləʳ]
A. ADJ
1. (Ling) → vernáculo, vulgar
in vernacular Persianen persa vulgar, en la lengua vernácula de Persia
2. [architecture] → típico, local, regional
B. N (Ling) → lengua f vernácula (fig) → lenguaje m corriente, lenguaje m vulgar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

vernacular

[vərˈnækjʊr] n (= dialect) → dialecte m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

vernacular

n
(= dialect)Mundart f; (= not Latin, not official language)Landessprache f; this word has now come into the vernaculardieses Wort ist jetzt in die Alltagssprache eingegangen
(= jargon)Fachsprache for -jargon m
(hum: = strong language) → deftige Sprache; please excuse the vernacularentschuldigen Sie bitte, dass ich mich so drastisch ausdrücke
(Archit) → traditioneller Baustil
adj
vernacular newspaperZeitung fin der regionalen Landessprache; vernacular languagemundartliche Sprache; vernacular poetMundartdichter(in) m(f)
(Archit) → traditionell
(= indigenous) styletraditionell; crafts, furnitureeinheimisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

vernacular

[vəˈnækjʊləʳ]
1. nvernacolo
2. adjvernacolare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

vernacular

(vəˈnӕkjulə) adjective
colloquial or informally conversational. vernacular speech/language.
noun
the common informal language of a country etc as opposed to its formal or literary language. They spoke to each other in the vernacular of the region.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The growing consumption of local language content on mobile phones is a clear indicator of the need for vernacularising the Smartphone ecosystem for bridging the gaping digital divide.
According to interviews I conducted in India for a doctoral research, 100 per cent of my study subjects' grandparents - the erstwhile colonised generation that 'fought' to drive the British out of India and English out of schools, the very generation that was keen on vernacularising the medium of instruction in government schools - have done a 180 degree turn and are embracing English today.
(87) In a similar vein with specific reference to the post-war Afrikaans community, Hofmeyr has shown that the vernacularising thrust of the Afrikaans language associations, established in 1905 and 1906, through the efforts of the taalstryders (88) spawned a succession of interconnected organisations which began to link teachers, clerics, small farmers, student organisations, lawyers and journalists into a constituency.