vernacularism


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ver·nac·u·lar·ism

 (vər-năk′yə-lə-rĭz′əm)
n.
A vernacular word or expression.

vernacularism

(vəˈnækjʊləˌrɪzəm)
n
(Linguistics) the use of the vernacular or a term in the vernacular

vernacularism

1. a word, phrase, or idiom from the native and popular language, contrasted with literary or learned language.
2. the use of the vernacular. — vernacular, n., adj.
See also: Language
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References in periodicals archive ?
While, as Briggs noted above, it certainly received praise overseas, in at least one significant case, its staunch vernacularism and core message about the toxicity of Australian 'mateship' fell on deaf ears.
Thus, while it is possible to observe formal similarities of historiographical language pertaining to the narrative modes, historicity, prose, and vernacularism of historical discourse, there is a rhetorical and topological dissemblance in the specificity and operation of the concrete narrative modes of typology, figural fulfilment, genealogy, and anagogical ascent in their Latin and French usage and Asian counterparts.
(13) Nezar Al Sayyad, "From Vernacularism to Globalism: The Temporal Reality of Traditional Settlements", Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review, Vol.
As mentioned earlier, postcolonial writers infuse their works with their local cultures and traditions: oral culture, vernacularism, local folklore, mythology, and history.
Still, Cervantes was a permanent defender of vernacularism. Thus the writing of biography could serve to praise the subject, or to cast infamy upon him or her.
Although the idealistic goals of the republic of letters remained, by 1630 publication had become an end in itself an end insufficient to sustain the blows usually seen as the cause of the decline of learned publications--which, besides the Thirty Years' War, included strident confessionalism, the re-Catholicization of some printing centres, and the rise of vernacularism.