portal

(redirected from vertical portal)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

por·tal

 (pôr′tl)
n.
1. A doorway, entrance, or gate, especially one that is large and imposing.
2. An entrance or a means of entrance: the local library, a portal of knowledge.
3. The portal vein.
4. A website considered as an entry point to other websites, often by being or providing access to a search engine.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the portal vein or the portal system.
2. Of or relating to a point of entrance to an organ, especially the transverse fissure of the liver, through which the blood vessels enter.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin portāle, city gate, from neuter of portālis, of a gate, from Latin porta, gate; see per- in Indo-European roots. N., sense 3 and adj., from New Latin porta (hepatis), transverse fissure (of the liver), literally gate of the liver, perhaps ultimately translation of Akkadian bāb (ekalli), gate (of the palace), umbilical fissure of the liver (next to the transverse fissure).]

portal

(ˈpɔːtəl)
n
1. (Architecture) an entrance, gateway, or doorway, esp one that is large and impressive
2. any entrance or access to a place
3. (Telecommunications) computing an internet site providing links to other sites
adj
(Anatomy) anatomy
a. of or relating to a portal vein: hepatic portal system.
b. of or relating to a porta
[C14: via Old French from Medieval Latin portāle, from Latin porta gate, entrance]

por•tal1

(ˈpɔr tl, ˈpoʊr-)

n.
1. a door, gate, or entrance, esp. one of imposing size and appearance.
2. an iron or steel bent for bracing a framed structure, having curved braces between the vertical members and a horizontal member at the top.
3. an entrance to a tunnel or mine.
4. Computers. a Web site that functions as an entrance to the Internet, as by providing useful content and organizing various sites and features on the World Wide Web or other parts of the Internet.
[1300–50; < Medieval Latin, n. use of neuter of portālis of a gate]

por•tal2

(ˈpɔr tl, ˈpoʊr-)
Anat. adj.
1. noting or pertaining to the transverse fissure of the liver.
n.
[1605–15; < Medieval Latin portālis of a gate. See port4, -al1]

portal

- An Internet site offering a directory of links to other sites.
See also related terms for links.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.portal - a grand and imposing entrance (often extended metaphorically)portal - a grand and imposing entrance (often extended metaphorically); "the portals of the cathedral"; "the portals of heaven"; "the portals of success"
entrance, entranceway, entryway, entree, entry - something that provides access (to get in or get out); "they waited at the entrance to the garden"; "beggars waited just outside the entryway to the cathedral"
2.portal - a site that the owner positions as an entrance to other sites on the internet; "a portal typically has search engines and free email and chat rooms etc."
internet site, web site, website, site - a computer connected to the internet that maintains a series of web pages on the World Wide Web; "the Israeli web site was damaged by hostile hackers"
3.portal - a short vein that carries blood into the liver
portal system - system of veins that carry blood from the abdominal organs to the liver
vein, vena, venous blood vessel - a blood vessel that carries blood from the capillaries toward the heart; "all veins except the pulmonary vein carry unaerated blood"

portal

noun (Literary) doorway, door, entry, way in, entrance, gateway, entrance way I entered through the royal portal.
Translations
portál
portaaliportti

portal

[ˈpɔːtl] Nportal m

portal

[ˈpɔːrtəl] n
(= entrance) → portail m
(COMPUTING) (= internet site) → portail mport authority nautorités fpl portuaires

portal

n (liter)Portal nt, → Pforte f (geh), → Tor nt; (Comput) → Portal nt

portal

[ˈpɔːtl] nportale m

por·tal

a. portal.
1. rel. al sistema portal;
2. rel. al punto de entrada de un microorganismo.

portal

adj portal; (vein) porta

portal

n portal m; patient — portal del paciente; — of entry portal de entrada
References in periodicals archive ?
He also served as vice president and CTO for Black Entertainment Television where he led the design and delivery of the world's largest African American vertical portal.
The model for this is GlobalSpec.com, an engineering information company that has build an impressive vertical portal. Engineers put in a search term and they get links to relevant Web information indexed for engineering terms as well as libraries of aggregated need-to-know data like regulatory information, patents, etc.
Their portal builder, PortalWorks, allows clients to build a vertical portal that is specific to a certain subject.
When Milwaukee-based Mortgage Guaranty Insurance Corporation (MGIC) announced eMagic.com in January 2000, here were the words we used to describe our vision in the press release: "Our goal is that, over time, eMagic.com will evolve into the Internet's premier business-to-business vertical portal for open access to all products and services necessary to assemble a home mortgage loan."
The Customize classification group is a State or National horizontal or vertical portal, typical of a service-industry-related, medium-sized enterprise (SME).
Vortals are a "vertical portal" that focus on a specific topic.
IPAS will be the first statewide official records vertical portal in the nation."
The vertical portal has tremendous potential to add value to a financial institution's online real estate and to build its brand and position in the marketplace.
Describing the Website as a "vertical portal" focused on the Granite State's local governments, there are many Mainstreetnh.com functions and content that are near ready for operation, and even more planned for the future.
A vertical portal, on the other hand, also offers a wide variety of information and services, but is targeted toward a very specific audience.
My daily walk around the block at noon takes me past both the AICPA, where initiatives such as the vertical portal and Cognitor[TM] certification program are generating lots of attention, and American Express Tax and Business Services, the birthplace of a completely new model for providing accounting services.