vestige

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ves·tige

 (vĕs′tĭj)
n.
1. A visible trace, evidence, or sign of something that once existed but exists or appears no more: a building that is the area's last vestige of its colonial era.
2. Biology A rudimentary or degenerate, usually nonfunctioning, structure that is the remnant of an organ or part that was fully developed or functioning in a preceding generation or an earlier stage of development.

[French, from Old French, from Latin vestīgium.]

vestige

(ˈvɛstɪdʒ)
n
1. a small trace, mark, or amount; hint: a vestige of truth; no vestige of the meal.
2. (Biology) biology an organ or part of an organism that is a small nonfunctioning remnant of a functional organ in an ancestor
[C17: via French from Latin vestīgium track]

ves•tige

(ˈvɛs tɪdʒ)

n.
1. a mark, trace, or visible evidence of something that is no longer present or in existence.
2. a very slight trace or amount of something: the last vestige of hope.
3. a degenerate or imperfectly developed biological structure that performed a useful function at an earlier stage in the development of the individual or evolution of the species.
[1535–45; < Middle French < Latin vestīgium footprint]
ves•tig•i•al (vɛˈstɪdʒ i əl, -ˈstɪdʒ əl) adj.
ves•tig′i•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vestige - an indication that something has been presentvestige - an indication that something has been present; "there wasn't a trace of evidence for the claim"; "a tincture of condescension"
footprint - a trace suggesting that something was once present or felt or otherwise important; "the footprints of an earlier civilization"
indicant, indication - something that serves to indicate or suggest; "an indication of foul play"; "indications of strain"; "symptoms are the prime indicants of disease"

vestige

noun
1. remnant, remains, trace, relic, track, token, remainder, residue the last vestiges of a great and ancient kingdom
2. trace, sign, hint, scrap, evidence, indication, suspicion, glimmer She had lost every vestige of her puppy fat.

vestige

noun
A mark or remnant that indicates the former presence of something:
Translations
pozůstatek
jäännösjalanjälkijälki
emlékmaradványnyom
なごり痕跡足跡

vestige

[ˈvestɪdʒ] N
1. (= trace) → vestigio m, rastro m
not a vestige of it remainsno queda rastro de ello, de ello no queda ni el menor vestigio
without a vestige of decencysin la menor decencia
if there is a vestige of doubtsi hay una sombra de duda
a vestige of truthun elemento or un tanto de verdad
2. (Bio) → rudimento m

vestige

[ˈvɛstɪdʒ] nvestige mvest pocket n (US)poche f de gilet

vestige

n
Spur f; the vestige of a moustache (Brit) or mustache (US) → der Anflug eines Schnurrbarts; there is not a vestige of truth in what he sayses ist kein Körnchen Wahrheit an dem, was er sagt
(Anat) → Rudiment nt

vestige

[ˈvɛstɪdʒ] nvestigio
the last vestiges of → le ultime vestigia di

ves·tige

n. vestigio, resto de una estructura que en una etapa previa de la especie o el embrión, tuvo un desarrollo completo.
References in classic literature ?
Only ragged vestiges of glass remained in its windows, and great sheets of the green facing had fallen away from the corroded metallic framework.
So old seemed these relics, these vestiges of vanity and memorials of affection and piety, so battered and worn and stained--so neglected, deserted, forgotten the place, that I could not help thinking myself the discoverer of the burial-ground of a prehistoric race of men whose very name was long extinct.
I shall content myself with barely observing here, that of all the confederacies of antiquity, which history has handed down to us, the Lycian and Achaean leagues, as far as there remain vestiges of them, appear to have been most free from the fetters of that mistaken principle, and were accordingly those which have best deserved, and have most liberally received, the applauding suffrages of political writers.
It was volcanic in origin, and was now fringed on three sides by coral reefs; some fumaroles to the northward, and a hot spring, were the only vestiges of the forces that had long since originated it.
The curate, I found, was quite incapable of dis- cussion; this new and culminating atrocity had robbed him of all vestiges of reason or forethought.
You behold another phase of his passion, a fury bejewelled with stars, mayhap bearing the crescent of the moon on its brow, shaking the last vestiges of its torn cloud-mantle in inky-black squalls, with hail and sleet descending like showers of crystals and pearls, bounding off the spars, drumming on the sails, pattering on the oilskin coats, whitening the decks of homeward-bound ships.
There appears to be a tendency to extinction among all the savage nations; and this tendency would seem to have been in operation among the aboriginals of this country long before the advent of the white men, if we may judge from the traces and traditions of ancient populousness in regions which were silent and deserted at the time of the discovery; and from the mysterious and perplexing vestiges of unknown races, predecessors of those found in actual possession, and who must long since have become gradually extinguished or been destroyed.
He had bought a large map representing the sea, Without the least vestige of land: And the crew were much pleased when they found it to be A map they could all understand.
Furthermore, you are now to consider that only in the extreme, lower, backward sloping part of the front of the head, is there the slightest vestige of bone; and not till you get near twenty feet from the forehead do you come to the full cranial development.
There remains to-day but a very imperceptible vestige of the Place de Grève, such as it existed then; it consists in the charming little turret, which occupies the angle north of the Place, and which, already enshrouded in the ignoble plaster which fills with paste the delicate lines of its sculpture, would soon have disappeared, perhaps submerged by that flood of new houses which so rapidly devours all the ancient façades of Paris.
and the old man licked his thin lips as though to taste the last sweet vestige of some dainty morsel.
There is a vestige of decency, a sense of shame, that does much to curb and check those outbreaks of atrocious cruelty so commonly enacted upon the plantation.