vestigial

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ves·tig·i·al

 (vĕ-stĭj′ē-əl, -stĭj′əl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or constituting a vestige.
2. Biology Occurring or persisting as a rudimentary or degenerate structure.

ves·tig′i·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vestigial

(vɛˈstɪdʒɪəl)
adj
1. of, relating to, or being a vestige
2. (Biology) (of certain organs or parts of organisms) having attained a simple structure and reduced size and function during the evolution of the species: the vestigial pelvic girdle of a snake.
vesˈtigially adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ves·tig·i·al

(vĕ-stĭj′ē-əl)
Relating to a body part that has become small and lost its use because of evolutionary change. Whales, for example, have small bones located in the muscles of their body walls that are vestigial bones of hips and hind limbs.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.vestigial - not fully developed in mature animals; "rudimentary wings"
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
undeveloped - not developed; "courses in interior design were rare and undeveloped"; "undeveloped social awareness"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

vestigial

adjective
1. rudimentary, undeveloped, incomplete, imperfect, non-functional The grass snake has vestigial limbs.
rudimentary developed, complete, perfect, useful, practical, functional
2. surviving, lasting, remaining, enduring, persisting, lingering, abiding, residual, leftover vestigial remains of this ancient custom
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

vestigial

[vesˈtɪdʒɪəl] ADJvestigial (Bio) → rudimentario
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

vestigial

adjspurenhaft; moustache, growthspärlich; (Anat) → rudimentär; the vestigial remains of the old city wallsdie Spuren or die rudimentären Reste der alten Stadtmauer; the vestigial remains of a customdie letzten Reste eines Brauches; the vestigial remains of my interest in artdie kümmerlichen Reste meines Interesses für Kunst
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

vestigial

[vɛˈstɪdʒɪəl] adj
a. (Bio) (organ) → vestigiale, rudimentale
b. (frm) (remaining) vestigial traces oftracce residue di
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ves·tig·i·al

a. vestigial.
1. rel. a vestigio;
2. rudimentario-a, imperfecto-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, one could say that the performatism in American Beauty [en Mi vida sin mi] gives the aleatory world of postmodernism a chance at redemption by introducing into it a sacral, sacrificial, vestigially christological moment.
Its mass depended almost vestigially from the frame.
Here he catches us off guard by stating, "I didn't suffer[;] I was an observer, not an emigrant," since after all "displacement isn't inherited, or perhaps it's only passed on vestigially." Perhaps.
Living fiber-tracheids contain nuclei and vestigially bordered pits, e-f Gnetum gnemon L., Carlquist 8088 (RSA).
But whereas Callicott earlier acknowledges instances wherein Leopold alternatively, albeit 'less consistently', characterises the land as an organism--in the later 'Conceptual Foundations', he limits Leopold's considered view to the Eltonian ecosystem-as-community analogy, there arguing that the organism model is only 'vestigially present' in Leopold's land ethic.
His discussion of the two ends with a consideration of Kerouac s vestigially Catholic understanding of the sinful, suffering, and redeemable human body.
Sansom's snaps of himself in drag--ubiquitous in earlier paintings but only vestigially present in this show at the lower-left corner of Crabtree's Pharmacopeia, 2015-16--have over the decades diverted attention from his main game, but then, a blond wig and high heels on a man are now mainstream.
This shift meant that the artificial entity theory, "under which the corporation derives its power from the state, lost most of its appeal, since the state was only vestigially involved in creating corporations." Avi-Yonah, supra note 124, at 1011-12.
In one we find substantial archaic morphology, as in rGyalrongic, Nungic, Kiranti, in some varieties of Kham within Magaric, and in dramatically modified form in Jinghpaw-Northern Naga and vestigially in Kuki-Chin.
Geoffrey Chaucer wrote his narrative work The Canterbury Tales in a time of transition from vestigially oral culture to functionally literate print culture.
For example, those who hold that Aquinas, as more "incarnational," has a higher estimation of "natural knowledge" than Bonaventure will have to contend with the fact that Bonaventure believes that humans can, by natural knowledge, know something of what God is as Trinity, even if only vestigially. That is, for Bonaventure, there is a discernible prodigality in the trinitarian patterns one finds in the natural order of things, a vestigial knowledge of the Trinity in our natural knowledge, while on this question Aquinas is far more reticent.
Although Occupy Wall Street continues vestigially, it didn't last long as a visible media spectacle.