viand


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vi·and

 (vī′ənd)
n.
1.
a. An item of food.
b. A very choice or delicious dish.
2. viands Provisions; victuals.

[Middle English viaunde, from Old French viande, from Vulgar Latin *vīvanda, alteration of Latin vīvenda, neuter pl. gerundive of vīvere, to live; see gwei- in Indo-European roots.]

viand

(ˈviːənd; ˈvaɪ-)
n
1. (Cookery) a type of food, esp a delicacy
2. (Cookery) (plural) provisions
[C14: from Old French viande, ultimately from Latin vīvenda things to be lived on, from vīvere to live]

vi•and

(ˈvaɪ ənd)

n.
1. an article of food.
2. viands, dishes of food, esp. delicacies.
[1350–1400; Middle English viaunde < Middle French viande < Vulgar Latin *vīvanda, for Latin vīvenda things to live on, neuter pl. ger. of vīvere to live]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.viand - a choice or delicious dishviand - a choice or delicious dish    
dish - a particular item of prepared food; "she prepared a special dish for dinner"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Now, in the first place, I should be loth to wait till to-morrow when I have the means of appeasing my hunger already before me: in the second place, the solid viands of to-day are more to my taste than the dainties that are promised me; in the third place, I don't see to-morrow's banquet, and how can I tell that it is not all a fable, got up by the greasy-faced fellow that is advising me to abstain in order that he may have all the good victuals to himself?
Athos called Grimaud, pointed to a large basket which lay in a corner, and made a sign to him to wrap the viands up in the napkins.
They could have wished for something more hearty and substantial; but, for want of better, made a voracious meal on these humble viands.
The pleasant odor of greasy viands mingled with the smell of smoke.
Many exquisite viands might be rejected by the epicure, if it was a sufficient cause for his contemning of them as common and vulgar, that something was to be found in the most paltry alleys under the same name.
When the viands and all the other entertainments that are usual in such banquets were finished, Oliverotto artfully began certain grave discourses, speaking of the greatness of Pope Alexander and his son Cesare, and of their enterprises, to which discourse Giovanni and others answered; but he rose at once, saying that such matters ought to be discussed in a more private place, and he betook himself to a chamber, whither Giovanni and the rest of the citizens went in after him.
To my amazement I found the sides of the pit, that I had thought smooth, lined with shelves, upon which were the most delicious viands and liquid refreshments that Okar afforded.
And though it is plain they could not do without eating and performing all the other natural functions, because, in fact, they were men like ourselves, it is plain too that, wandering as they did the most part of their lives through woods and wilds and without a cook, their most usual fare would be rustic viands such as those thou now offer me; so that, friend Sancho, let not that distress thee which pleases me, and do not seek to make a new world or pervert knight-errantry.
When he breakfasted or dined all the resources of the club--its kitchens and pantries, its buttery and dairy--aided to crowd his table with their most succulent stores; he was served by the gravest waiters, in dress coats, and shoes with swan-skin soles, who proffered the viands in special porcelain, and on the finest linen; club decanters, of a lost mould, contained his sherry, his port, and his cinnamon-spiced claret; while his beverages were refreshingly cooled with ice, brought at great cost from the American lakes.
They continually invited me to partake of food, and when after eating heartily I declined the viands they continued to offer me, they seemed to think that my appetite stood in need of some piquant stimulant to excite its activity.
for such it was in my eyes) and every luxury; they had a fire to warm them when chill and delicious viands when hungry; they were dressed in excellent clothes; and, still more, they enjoyed one another's company and speech, interchanging each day looks of affection and kindness.
Yet, human fellowship infused some nourishment into the flinty viands, and struck some sparks of cheerfulness out of them.