vicarage

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vic·ar·age

 (vĭk′ər-ĭj)
n.
1. The residence of a vicar.
2. The benefice of a vicar.
3. The duties or office of a vicar; a vicariate.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vicarage

(ˈvɪkərɪdʒ)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the residence or benefice of a vicar
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a rare word for vicariate1
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vic•ar•age

(ˈvɪk ər ɪdʒ)

n.
1. the residence of a vicar.
2. the office, benefice, or duties of a vicar.
[1375–1425]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vicarage - an official residence provided by a church for its parson or vicar or rectorvicarage - an official residence provided by a church for its parson or vicar or rector
glebe house - a parsonage (especially one provided for the holder of a benefice)
residence - the official house or establishment of an important person (as a sovereign or president); "he refused to live in the governor's residence"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
بَيْت راعي الكَنيسَه
vikářství
præstegård
paplak
prestssetur
vikárstvo
papaz evi

vicarage

[ˈvɪkərɪdʒ] Ncasa f del párroco
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

vicarage

[ˈvɪkərɪdʒ] npresbytère m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

vicarage

nPfarrhaus nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

vicarage

[ˈvɪkərɪdʒ] ncanonica (anglicana)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

vicar

(ˈvikə) noun
a clergyman of the Church of England.
ˈvicarage (-ridʒ) noun
the house of a vicar.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The vicarage, nestling close under the shadow of the church-tower, threw no illumination of fire-light or candle-light on the dreary scene.
Carey set out to walk with Philip to the vicarage; it took them little more than five minutes, and, when they reached it, Philip suddenly remembered the gate.
On his first visit to the vicarage he had come with his nurse, and Mrs.
They still continued to live at the vicarage, the lady dividing her time between her father, her husband, and their poor parishioners, - and subsequently her rising family; and now that the Reverend Michael Millward has been gathered to his fathers, full of years and honours, the Reverend Richard Wilson has succeeded him to the vicarage of Linden-hope, greatly to the satisfaction of its inhabitants, who had so long tried and fully proved his merits, and those of his excellent and well-loved partner.
At this moment of the morning Angel Clare was riding along a narrow lane ten miles distant from the breakfasters, in the direction of his father's Vicarage at Emminster, carrying, as well as he could, a little basket which contained some black-puddings and a bottle of mead, sent by Mrs Crick, with her kind respects, to his parents.
His father's hill-surrounded little town, the Tudor church-tower of red stone, the clump of trees near the Vicarage, came at last into view beneath him, and he rode down towards the well-known gate.
My way back to the Vicarage was his way back to the inn.
In two days he had returned to the Vicarage with a very startling message.
'A quiet little vicarage, with an ivy-clad porch, an old-fashioned garden, and--'
The next morning after breakfast Joe put Merrylegs into the mistress' low chaise to take him to the vicarage; he came first and said good-by to us, and Merrylegs neighed to us from the yard.
Let us go down to the Vicarage and inquire about it."
Their road to this detached cottage was down Vicarage Lane, a lane leading at right angles from the broad, though irregular, main street of the place; and, as may be inferred, containing the blessed abode of Mr.