vigintillion


Also found in: Wikipedia.

vi·gin·til·lion

 (vī′jĭn-tĭl′yən)
n.
1. The cardinal number equal to 1063.
2. Chiefly British The cardinal number equal to 10120.

[Latin vīgintī, twenty; see wīkm̥tī- in Indo-European roots + (m)illion.]

vi′gin·til′lion adj.
vi′gin·til′lionth adj.adv. & n.

vigintillion

(ˌvaɪdʒɪnˈtɪljən)
n
1. (Mathematics) US and Brit a large number equal to 1063
2. (Mathematics) a large number equal to 10120 in older British English and in Continental European and Latin American countries
References in periodicals archive ?
Physics theories suggest that sometime between 10^34 (1 decillion) and 10^64 (1 vigintillion) years from now, the protons found in the nuclei of all atoms will decay.
Below I summarise Mike's reported and my reported or new AV results for every English single-word number name up to vigintillion (the largest continuous number in Web3) except two and six.
The numerically last EVEN number name is-- ninE hundred ninety nine Vigintillion ninE huNdred The numerically last ODD number name is-- nine hundred ninety nine vigintillin nine hundred ninety nine OctoDecillion nine hundred ninety nine thousanD The numerically last EVENODD number name is-- ninE hundred ninety nine Vigintillion ninE huNdred ninety nine OctoDecillion cxnine hundred ninety nine thousanD The numerically last ODDEVEN number name is-- nine hundred ninety nine vigintilliOn nine hunDreD ninEty nine noVemdEcillioN The rules can be changed in different ways to produceadditionalchallenges.
Highest minus E: sixty-six vigintillion, sixty-six nonillion, sixty-six octillion, sixty-six quintillion, sixty-six quadrillion, sixty-six trillion, sixty-six billion, sixty-six million, sixty-six thousand, sixty-six.
It was easy to show that none did, and to extend the argument to all number-names between one and one thousand vigintillion. I discovered that if one stopped the list at other points, matches did occur; for example Jeremy Morse found that the 23 l-list matched at 101,200, 205, 224 and 227.
but upon reaching the extremely large VIGINTILLION, there isn't another number name until reaching the extremely larger CENTILLION.
NOVEMDECILLION ([10.sup.60]) = (Nine + One)(Vigintillion)/([Eight x M/D x Eight] x [C x I x {L+L}]/[I + [One.sup.Nine]])
Seriously, now, Loren: How about one vigintillion? Or, if you want to play hardball, one centillion?
The topic of interestingness languished for eighteen years, before being revived in the November 1998 issue with Dave Morice's "All Numbers Less Than 100 Are Interesting?" in which he looked for logological properties unique with respect to all vigintillion cardinals.
There are a lot of interesting number names, but when you consider that there are one thousand vigintillion number names, there must be quintillions that are really, really boring.
The same argument goes for these numbers too: TRILLION, QUADRILLION, QUINTILLION, SEXTILLION, SEPTILLION, OCTILLION, NONILLION, DECILLION, UNDECILLION, DUODECILLION, TREDECILLION, QUATTUORDECILLION, QUINDECILLION, SEXDECILLION, SEPTENDECILLION, OCTODECILLION, NOVEMDECILLION, VIGINTILLION ...
The following falls one letter short of a full deck: one hundred fifty eight vigintillion one novemdecillion one septendecillion one quindecillion one hundred sixty four sextition seven hundred twenty six quintillion twenty quadrillion one billion runs the alphabet in order starting with D but omits C.