vignetting


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vi·gnette

 (vĭn-yĕt′)
n.
1. A decorative design placed at the beginning or end of a book or chapter of a book or along the border of a page.
2. An unbordered picture, often a portrait, that shades off into the surrounding color at the edges.
3.
a. A short, usually descriptive literary sketch.
b. A short scene or incident, as from a movie.
tr.v. vi·gnet·ted, vi·gnet·ting, vi·gnettes
1. To provide (a photograph or image) with indistinct or fading edges.
2. To describe in a brief way.

[French, from Old French, diminutive of vigne, vine (from the use of vine tendrils in decorative borders); see vine.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vignetting

(vɪˈnjɛtɪŋ)
n
1. (Photography) the technique of producing a photographic vignette, esp a portrait, by progressively reducing the amount of light falling on the photographic surface towards the edges
2. (Photography) the reduction in area of a light beam passing through a camera lens as the obliquity of the beam is increased
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vignetting

A method of producing a band of color or tone on a map or chart, the density of which is reduced uniformly from edge to edge.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Four electronic vignetting devices have been launched on 4thA of January at the Danube Bridge border crossing at Rousse.
This paper discusses one of the steps of the photometric calibration procedure: the correction of the brightness decrease observed from the center of the picture to its periphery, commonly called the vignetting effect, as illustrated in Fig.
When using HDR techniques and fisheye lenses for luminance measurements, it is necessary to correct for the vignetting effect in order to obtain reliable data.
Different methodologies have been explored in the literature to determine the vignetting effect of lenses.
Anaokar and Moeck [2005] determined the vignetting effect of a nonwide angle lens for a single aperture (f/7.9).
In an evaluation of the potential of HDR photography as a luminance data tool, Inanici described the way to determine the vignetting effect of a fisheye lens [Inanici 2006].
Another study determined the vignetting effect of a similar fisheye lens [Jacobs and Wilson 2007].
Researchers using HDR techniques as a luminance data acquisition tool determine the proper vignetting corrections to apply to their lens.