vile

(redirected from vilest)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to vilest: depraved, moralistically

vile

disgusting; loathsome; depraved: He’s a vile man with a cruel streak.
Not to be confused with:
vial – a small container used for liquids: The biology student held up a vial of swamp water.
viol – a stringed musical instrument: He was the finest viol player in the orchestra.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

vile

 (vīl)
adj. vil·er, vil·est
1. Morally depraved; ignoble or wicked: a vile traitor; vile accusations.
2.
a. Disgusting; repulsive: vile effluent running down the city streets.
b. Unpleasant or objectionable: vile weather. See Synonyms at offensive.
3. Miserably poor and degrading; wretched: a vile existence.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin vīlis, cheap, worthless; see wes- in Indo-European roots.]

vile′ly adv.
vile′ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vile

(vaɪl)
adj
1. abominably wicked; shameful or evil: the vile development of slavery appalled them.
2. morally despicable; ignoble: vile accusations.
3. disgusting to the senses or emotions; foul: a vile smell; vile epithets.
4. tending to humiliate or degrade: only slaves would perform such vile tasks.
5. unpleasant or bad: vile weather.
6. paltry: a vile reward.
[C13: from Old French vil, from Latin vīlis cheap]
ˈvilely adv
ˈvileness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vile

(vaɪl)

adj. vil•er, vil•est.
1. wretchedly bad: vile weather.
2. highly offensive, unpleasant, or objectionable: a vile odor.
3. morally debased, depraved, or despicable.
4. menial; lowly: vile tasks.
5. of little value or account; paltry.
[1250–1300; Middle English vil < Old French < Latin vīlis of little worth, base, cheap]
vile′ly, adv.
vile′ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.vile - morally reprehensible; "would do something as despicable as murder"; "ugly crimes"; "the vile development of slavery appalled them"; "a slimy little liar"
evil - morally bad or wrong; "evil purposes"; "an evil influence"; "evil deeds"
2.vile - causing or able to cause nauseavile - causing or able to cause nausea; "a nauseating smell"; "nauseous offal"; "a sickening stench"
unwholesome - detrimental to physical or moral well-being; "unwholesome food"; "unwholesome habits like smoking"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

vile

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

vile

adjective
2. Heavily soiled; very dirty or unclean:
3. Extremely unpleasant to the senses or feelings:
4. Having or proceeding from low moral standards:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
خَسيس، فَظيع، رَديءوَضِيع
hnusnýodporný
afskyelig
paha
grozan
viîbjóîslegur, andstyggilegur
堕落した
비열한
niekšiškainiekšiškas
nekrietnspretīgszemisks
avskyvärd
ชั่วร้าย เลวร้าย
ghê tởm

vile

[vaɪl] ADJ
1. (= base, evil) [person, behaviour, attack, regime] → vil, infame; [language] → abominable
he was vile to herse portó de un modo infame con ella
2. (= disgusting) [conditions] → miserable, infame; [weather] → pésimo, infame; [smell, taste] → repugnante
it smelled/tasted viletenía un olor/sabor repugnante
to be in a vile moodestar de pésimo humor, estar de un humor de mil demonios
he has a vile tempertiene un genio muy violento, tiene un genio de mil demonios
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

vile

[ˈvaɪl] adj
(= base) [action, crime] → infâme; [attack, trade] → vil(e) before n
(= very bad) [smell, taste] → abominable; [temper] → massacrant(e); [weather] → abominable
Ricky has a vile temper sometimes → Ricky est parfois d'humeur massacrante.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

vile

adjabscheulich; mood, smell, habit also, regime, conditionsübel; thoughtsniedrig, gemein; languageunflätig; weather, foodscheußlich, widerlich; that was a vile thing to sayes war eine Gemeinheit, so etwas zu sagen; he was vile to his wifeer benahm sich scheußlich gegenüber seiner Frau; to be in a vile temper or moodganz übel gelaunt sein
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

vile

[vaɪl] adj (horrible) → orrendo/a; (very bad, temper) → pessimo/a; (smell) → disgustoso/a
what a vile trick! → che scherzo meschino!
a vile habit → un vizio detestabile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

vile

(vail) adjective
horrible; wicked; disgusting. That was a vile thing to say!; The food tasted vile.
ˈvilely adverb
ˈvileness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

vile

وَضِيع hnusný afskyelig abscheulich πρόστυχος vil paha infect grozan disgustoso 堕落した 비열한 walgelijk sjofel nikczemny desprezível подлый avskyvärd ชั่วร้าย เลวร้าย kokuşmuş ghê tởm 极坏的
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
He is the meanest of living men, and his wife is the vilest of living women.
The same animal which hath the honour to have some part of his flesh eaten at the table of a duke, may perhaps be degraded in another part, and some of his limbs gibbeted, as it were, in the vilest stall in town.
You enter, and proceed to that most-visited little gallery that exists in the world--the Tribune--and there, against the wall, without obstructing rag or leaf, you may look your fill upon the foulest, the vilest, the obscenest picture the world possesses--Titian's Venus.
Upon inquiry I was told, "that their names were to be found on no record, except a few of them, whom history has represented as the vilest of rogues and traitors." As to the rest, I had never once heard of them.
It is also the vilest affection, and the most depraved; for which cause it is the proper attribute of the devil, who is called, the envious man, that soweth tares amongst the wheat by night; as it always cometh to pass, that envy worketh subtilly, and in the dark, and to the prejudice of good things, such as is the wheat.
Few things could have been more to their liking than to give him a tow over the side, for to the forecastle he had sent messes and concoctions of the vilest order.
He had told his hearers that he was altogether vile, a viler companion of the vilest, the worst of sinners, an abomination, a thing of unimaginable iniquity, and that the only wonder was that they did not see his wretched body shrivelled up before their eyes by the burning wrath of the Almighty!
We were there five minutes, and when we got out it was hard to tell which of us carried the vilest fragrance.
Think of those pure eyes looking at a man who has been accus ed (and never wholly absolved) of the foulest and the vilest of all murders, and then think of what that man must feel if he have any heart and any sense of shame left in him.
The vilest breeze that blows--a hot east wind in London--was the breeze abroad on that day.
Not vapid, waterish amusements, but good strong stuff; dealing in round abuse and blackguard names; pulling off the roofs of private houses, as the Halting Devil did in Spain; pimping and pandering for all degrees of vicious taste, and gorging with coined lies the most voracious maw; imputing to every man in public life the coarsest and the vilest motives; scaring away from the stabbed and prostrate body-politic, every Samaritan of clear conscience and good deeds; and setting on, with yell and whistle and the clapping of foul hands, the vilest vermin and worst birds of prey.
The vilest deeds, like poison weeds, Bloom well in prison air; It is only what is good in Man That wastes and withers there; Pale Anguish keeps the heavy gate, And the Warder is Despair.