villain


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vil·lain

 (vĭl′ən)
n.
1. A wicked or evil person; a scoundrel.
2. A dramatic or fictional character who is typically at odds with the hero.
3. (also vĭl′ān′, vĭ-lān′) Variant of villein.
4. Something said to be the cause of particular trouble or an evil: poverty, the villain in the increase of crime.
5. Obsolete A peasant regarded as vile and brutish.

[Middle English vilein, feudal serf, person of coarse feelings, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *vīllānus, feudal serf, from Latin vīlla, country house; see weik- in Indo-European roots.]

villain

(ˈvɪlən)
n
1. a wicked or malevolent person
2. (in a novel, play, film, etc) the main evil character and antagonist to the hero
3. often jocular a mischievous person; rogue
4. police slang Brit a criminal
5. (Historical Terms) history a variant spelling of villein
6. obsolete an uncouth person; boor
[C14: from Old French vilein serf, from Late Latin vīllānus worker on a country estate, from Latin: villa]
ˈvillainess fem n

vil•lain

(ˈvɪl ən)

n.
1. a cruelly malicious person who is involved in or devoted to wickedness or crime; scoundrel.
2. a character in a play, novel, or the like, who constitutes an important evil agency in the plot.
[1275–1325; < Middle French < Late Latin villānus a farm servant]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.villain - a wicked or evil personvillain - a wicked or evil person; someone who does evil deliberately
unwelcome person, persona non grata - a person who for some reason is not wanted or welcome
blackguard, bounder, cad, hound, heel, dog - someone who is morally reprehensible; "you dirty dog"
gallows bird - a person who deserves to be hanged
knave, rapscallion, rascal, rogue, varlet, scalawag, scallywag - a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
villainess - a woman villain
2.villain - the principal bad character in a film or work of fictionvillain - the principal bad character in a film or work of fiction
persona, theatrical role, role, character, part - an actor's portrayal of someone in a play; "she played the part of Desdemona"

villain

noun
1. evildoer, criminal, rogue, profligate, scoundrel, wretch, libertine, knave (archaic), reprobate, miscreant, malefactor, blackguard, rapscallion, caitiff (archaic) As a copper, I've spent my life putting villains like him away.
2. baddy (informal), antihero Darth Vader, the villain of the Star Wars trilogy
baddy hero, heroine, goody

villain

noun
A mean, worthless character in a story or play:
Slang: heavy.
Translations
نَذْل، وَغْدوَغْد
darebákzlosyn
skurkslyngel
roisto
negativac
òorpari
悪党
악한
nelietis
zlosyn
hudobnež
skurk
ตัวชั่วร้าย
hainkötü adam
kẻ ác

villain

[ˈvɪlən] N
1. (= wrongdoer) → maleante mf, delincuente mf
2. (hum) (= rascal) → bribón/ona m/f, tunante/a m/f
3. (in novel, film) → malo/a m/f
the villain of the piece is Malone (hum) → el malo de la historia es Malone

villain

[ˈvɪlən] n
(in novel, film, play)méchant m
He was cast as the villain → Il avait le rôle du méchant.
(= scoundrel) → scélérat m
(= criminal) → bandit m

villain

n
(= scoundrel)Schurke m, → Schurkin f; (inf: = criminal) → Verbrecher(in) m(f), → Ganove m (inf)
(in drama, novel) → Bösewicht m
(inf: = rascal) → Bengel m; he’s the villain of the pieceer ist der Übeltäter

villain

[ˈvɪlən] nmascalzone m (hum) (rascal) → briccone/a; (scoundrel) → canaglia; (in novel, film) → cattivo (fam) (criminal) → delinquente m

villain

(ˈvilən) noun
a person who is wicked or of very bad character. the villain of the play/story.
ˈvillainous adjective
ˈvillainyplural ˈvillainies noun
(an instance of) wickedness. His villainy was well known.

villain

وَغْد darebák skurk Bösewicht αχρείος villano roisto méchant negativac furfante 悪党 악한 schurk kjeltring łajdak vilão злодей skurk ตัวชั่วร้าย hain kẻ ác 恶棍
References in classic literature ?
Some of the author's friends cryed, "Look'e, gentlemen, the man is a villain, but it is nature for all that.
Now we, who are admitted behind the scenes of this great theatre of Nature (and no author ought to write anything besides dictionaries and spelling-books who hath not this privilege), can censure the action, without conceiving any absolute detestation of the person, whom perhaps Nature may not have designed to act an ill part in all her dramas; for in this instance life most exactly resembles the stage, since it is often the same person who represents the villain and the heroe; and he who engages your admiration to-day will probably attract your contempt to-morrow.
A single bad act no more constitutes a villain in life, than a single bad part on the stage.
The worst of men generally have the words rogue and villain most in their mouths, as the lowest of all wretches are the aptest to cry out low in the pit.
They encouraged the struggling hero with cries, and jeered the villain, hooting and calling attention to his whiskers.
The last act was a triumph for the hero, poor and of the masses, the representative of the audience, over the villain and the rich man, his pockets stuffed with bonds, his heart packed with tyrannical purposes, imperturbable amid suffering.
The latter spent most of his time out at soak in pale-green snow storms, busy with a nickel-plated revolver, rescuing aged strangers from villains.
Nay, had the villains glanced aside into the spring, even they would hardly have known themselves as reflected there.
Actor Kenneth Branagh says he would love to play the villain in the next James Bond movie.
He started his film career in 1966 as a villain and then he performed as hero in film, 'Phanne Khan', with Noor Jahan.
In the study, researchers compared "hero-villain skin dichotomy" between the all-time top 10 American film villains and top 10 film heroes.
When you portray the hero archetype, there are certain rules you have to stick to, whereas playing a villain is kind of a free-for-all.