villainage


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vil·lain·age

 (vĭl′ə-nĭj)
n.
Variant of villeinage.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

villainage

(ˈvɪlənɪdʒ)
n
(Historical Terms) a variant spelling of villeinage
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.villainage - the legal status or condition of servitude of a villein or feudal serf
legal status - a status defined by law
servitude - state of subjection to an owner or master or forced labor imposed as punishment; "penal servitude"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

villeinage

also villainage
noun
A state of subjugation to an owner or master:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Harbord suggested that what colonial officials had initially interpreted as slavery was actually more akin to 'the peculiar institution of villainage [that] survived the passing of the feudalism of the Middle Ages', and which 'lingered in England until the days of the Stuarts'.
See also Petrushevskii's significant review of Vinogradov: (Paul Vinogradoff), Villainage in England: Essays in Mediaeval English History (Oxford: Clarendon, 1892): "Novoe issledovanie o proiskhozhdenii feodal'nogo stroia," ZhMNP (December 1892): 307-76, as well as his other articles of the same type on the "decay of feudalism" that appeared between October 1896 and March 1897.
Page, The End of Villainage in England (New York, 1900), in Eng.