villainy

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Related to villainies: evildoer

vil·lain·y

 (vĭl′ə-nē)
n. pl. vil·lain·ies
1. Villainous conduct or action: "He made the excuse that a seaman, being under strict discipline, had few opportunities for villainy" (P.D. James).
2. A villainous act: outraged by their villainies.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

villainy

(ˈvɪlənɪ)
n, pl -lainies
1. conduct befitting a villain; vicious behaviour or action
2. an evil, abhorrent, or criminal act or deed
3. the fact or condition of being villainous
4. (Historical Terms) English history a rare word for villeinage
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vil•lain•y

(ˈvɪl ə ni)

n., pl. -lain•ies.
1. the actions or conduct of a villain; outrageous wickedness.
2. a villainous act or deed.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.villainy - the quality of evil by virtue of villainous behaviorvillainy - the quality of evil by virtue of villainous behavior
evilness, evil - the quality of being morally wrong in principle or practice; "attempts to explain the origin of evil in the world"
2.villainy - a criminal or vicious actvillainy - a criminal or vicious act    
evildoing, transgression - the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; "the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

villainy

noun wickedness, crime, vice, sin, atrocity, delinquency, criminality, depravity, iniquity, turpitude, baseness, devilry, knavery, rascality They justify their villainy in the name of their high ideals.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

villainy

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
دنائَه، نَذالَه
ničemnost
slyngelagtighed
òorparaskapur, illmennska
ničomnosť
alçaklıkzalimlik

villainy

[ˈvɪlənɪ] N (esp poet) → maldad f, vileza f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

villainy

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

villainy

[ˈvɪlənɪ] nscelleratezza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

villain

(ˈvilən) noun
a person who is wicked or of very bad character. the villain of the play/story.
ˈvillainous adjective
ˈvillainyplural ˈvillainies noun
(an instance of) wickedness. His villainy was well known.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Let us suppose an inhabitant of some remote and superior region, yet unskilled in the ways of men, having read and considered the precepts of the gospel, and the example of our Saviour, to come down in search of the true church: if he would not inquire after it among the cruel, the insolent, and the oppressive; among those who are continually grasping at dominion over souls as well as bodies; among those who are employed in procuring to themselves impunity for the most enormous villainies, and studying methods of destroying their fellow-creatures, not for their crimes but their errors; if he would not expect to meet benevolence, engage in massacres, or to find mercy in a court of inquisition, he would not look for the true church in the Church of Rome.
As to the sailors, he was sure that the jungle would exact from them expiation for their villainies, nor, doubtless, was he wrong, for his were the last white man's eyes to rest upon any of them.
There will free readings of classic crime written by the likes of Edgar Allan Poe and Agatha Christie on the Saturday, and a talk by Gail-Nina Anderson on the Sunday about Victorian Villainies, from the melodramatic Sweeney Todd to the real-life horrors of Jack the Ripper.