villous

(redirected from villous atrophy)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

vil·lous

 (vĭl′əs)
adj.
1. Biology Of, relating to, resembling, or covered with villi.
2. Botany Covered with long soft hairs.

[From Latin villōsus, hairy, from villus, shaggy hair.]

vil′lous·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

villous

(ˈvɪləs)
adj
1. (Botany) (of plant parts) covered with long hairs
2. (Zoology) of, relating to, or having villi
3. (Anatomy) of, relating to, or having villi
4. (Botany) of, relating to, or having villi
[C14: from Latin villōsus, from villus tuft of hair]
ˈvillously adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vil•lous

(ˈvɪl əs)

adj.
covered with or of the nature of villi; villiform.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin villōsus shaggy; see villus, -ous]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

vil·lous

a. velloso-a, velludo-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
FDRs with villous atrophy were identified by a level of anti-TTG ≥2.75 of the upper limit of normal with sensitivity, specificity, and a positive predictive value of 87, 82, and 95 percent, respectively.
However, with regard to the ileum samples, ileumhemorrhage, ileum inflammation, reduction in villous depth, and villous atrophy were evaluated.
The endoscopic image of the duodenum was normal, no villous atrophy was found.
Small bowel biopsy showed mild duodenitis but no villous atrophy was seen.
Clinical improvement and partial villous recovery have been reported in some patients with villous atrophy following the introduction of a gluten-free diet.
The degree of mucosal damage was further graded according to the standard Marsh-Oberhuber classification: Marsh 0 represents normal mucosa; Marsh I stands for increased LIEs (>25/100 enterocytes); Marsh II for hyper-plastic crypts; and Marsh III grades are partial (a), subtotal (b), or total (c) villous atrophy (21,22).
In the non-neoplastic intestinal mucosa, villous atrophy, cryptal hyperplasia, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in lamina propria were observed (Figure 2).
Histopathological examination of biopsy specimens revealed total villous atrophy, increased intraepithelial lymphocyte count, and crypt hyperplasia (Figures 2, 3).
Histologically, the small bowel demonstrates variable degrees of villous atrophy, epithelial crowding, epithelial disorganization, basement membrane abnormalities, and crypt hyperplasia [1, 3].
Since the fifties, the diagnosis of coeliac disease has depended on duodenal biopsy findings that include different degrees of villous atrophy along with crypt hyperplasia and intraepithelial lymphocytosis, which are graded by the Marsh classification (Marsh I-IIIC) (3,4).
Although 90% of individuals with dermatitis herpetiformis lack any gastrointestinal symptoms, about 75% have villous atrophy, Dr.
Crypt hyperproliferation and villous shortening, resulting in partial villous atrophy, reportedly occur as specific morphological features of HIV enteropathy and can be observed at all stages of HIV infection [8-10].