violation


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vi·o·la·tion

 (vī′ə-lā′shən)
n.
The act or an instance of violating or the condition of being violated: a violation of the law; the violation of a country's neutrality. See Synonyms at breach.

vi•o•la•tion

(ˌvaɪ əˈleɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of violating or the state of being violated.
2. a breach or infringement, as of a law or promise.
3. a sexual assault, esp. rape.
4. desecration; profanation.
5. a distortion of meaning or fact.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin]
syn: See breach.

violation

The process or an act of breaking or disregarding a law.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.violation - a crime less serious than a felony
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
breach of the peace, disorderly behavior, disorderly conduct, disturbance of the peace - any act of molesting, interrupting, hindering, agitating, or arousing from a state of repose or otherwise depriving inhabitants of the peace and quiet to which they are entitled
false pretence, false pretense - (law) an offense involving intent to defraud and false representation and obtaining property as a result of that misrepresentation
indecent exposure, public nudity - vulgar and offensive nakedness in a public place
bearing false witness, lying under oath, perjury - criminal offense of making false statements under oath
sedition - an illegal action inciting resistance to lawful authority and tending to cause the disruption or overthrow of the government
2.violation - an act that disregards an agreement or a rightviolation - an act that disregards an agreement or a right; "he claimed a violation of his rights under the Fifth Amendment"
actus reus, wrongful conduct, misconduct, wrongdoing - activity that transgresses moral or civil law; "he denied any wrongdoing"
copyright infringement, infringement of copyright - a violation of the rights secured by a copyright
foul - an act that violates the rules of a sport
patent infringement - violation of the rights secured by a patent
3.violation - entry to another's property without right or permissionviolation - entry to another's property without right or permission
actus reus, wrongful conduct, misconduct, wrongdoing - activity that transgresses moral or civil law; "he denied any wrongdoing"
inroad - an encroachment or intrusion; "they made inroads in the United States market"
4.violation - a disrespectful actviolation - a disrespectful act      
evil, wickedness, immorality, iniquity - morally objectionable behavior
desecration, profanation, sacrilege, blasphemy - blasphemous behavior; the act of depriving something of its sacred character; "desecration of the Holy Sabbath"
5.violation - the crime of forcing a woman to submit to sexual intercourse against her will
date rape - rape in which the rapist is known to the victim (as when they are on a date together)
sex crime, sex offense, sexual abuse, sexual assault - a statutory offense that provides that it is a crime to knowingly cause another person to engage in an unwanted sexual act by force or threat; "most states have replaced the common law definition of rape with statutes defining sexual assault"
statutory rape, carnal abuse - sexual intercourse with a person (girl or boy) who has not reached the age of consent (even if both parties participate willingly)

violation

noun
1. breach, abuse, infringement, contravention, abuse, trespass, transgression, infraction This is a flagrant violation of state law.
2. invasion, intrusion, trespass, breach, disturbance, disruption, interruption, encroachment Legal action will be initiated for defamation and violation of privacy.
3. desecration, sacrilege, defilement, profanation, spoliation This violation of the church is not the first such incident.
4. rape, sexual assault, molesting, ravishing (old-fashioned), abuse, sexual abuse, indecent assault, molestation the violation of women in war

violation

noun
1. An act or instance of breaking a law or regulation or of nonfulfillment of an obligation or promise, for example:
2. An act of disrespect or impiety toward something regarded as sacred:
Translations
kršitev

violation

[ˌvaɪəˈleɪʃən] N
1. [of law] → violación f, infracción f; [of rights] → violación f
violation of privacyentrometimiento m, intromisión f
it was in violation of the law/agreementviolaba la ley/el acuerdo
it was in violation of sanctionsincumplía or desobedecía las sanciones
2. (US) (= minor offence) → infracción f, falta f leve
a minor traffic violationuna infracción de tráfico
3. (o.f. or liter) (= rape) → violación f

violation

[ˌvaɪəˈleɪʃən] n
[agreement, law] → violation f
in violation of sth [+ rule, law] → en violation de qch
[grave] → violation f
the violation of the graves → la violation des sépultures

violation

n
(of law)Übertretung (→ of +gen), → Verletzung f (→ of +gen), → Verstoß m(of gegen); (of rule)Verstoß m(of gegen); (of rights)Verletzung f; (of truth)Vergewaltigung f; a violation of a treatyein Vertragsbruch m; (partial) → eine Vertragsverletzung; traffic violationVerkehrsvergehen nt; he did this in violation of the conditions agreeder verstieß damit gegen die Vereinbarungen
(of holy place)Entweihung f, → Schändung f; (of peacefulness)Störung f; (of privacy)Eingriff m (→ of in +acc)
(= rape)Vergewaltigung f, → Schändung f

violation

[ˌvaɪəˈleɪʃn] nviolazione f
in violation of sth → in contravvenzione f inv a qc
References in classic literature ?
The JUST causes of war, for the most part, arise either from violation of treaties or from direct violence.
Some historians- those biographical and specialist historians already referred to- in their simplicity failing to understand the question of the meaning of power, seem to consider that the collective will of the people is unconditionally transferred to historical persons, and therefore when describing some single state they assume that particular power to be the one absolute and real power, and that any other force opposing this is not a power but a violation of power- mere violence.
The disease and deformity around us certify the infraction of natural, intellectual, and moral laws, and often violation on violation to breed such compound misery.
The homes of the Military and Artisan classes were inspected in a course of visitations extending through upwards of a year; and during that period every town, village, and hamlet was systematically purged of that excess of the lower orders which had been brought about by the neglect to pay the tribute of Criminals to the Schools and University, and by the violation of the other natural Laws of the Constitution of Flatland.
But the violation of marriage, or any other unchastity, was never heard of; and the married pair pass their lives with the same friendship and mutual benevolence, that they bear to all others of the same species who come in their way, without jealousy, fondness, quarrelling, or discontent.
Wickham represented them, so gross a violation of everything right could hardly have been concealed from the world; and that friendship between a person capable of it, and such an amiable man as Bingley, was incomprehensible.
Manson Mingott's flesh had long since made it impossible for her to go up and down stairs, and with characteristic independence she had made her reception rooms upstairs and established herself (in flagrant violation of all the New York proprieties) on the ground floor of her house; so that, as you sat in her sitting-room window with her, you caught
These flowers and shrubs grew of themselves, and their presence was no violation of the natural environment.
Violation of this law was made a high misdemeanor and punished accordingly.
It is the other part of your offence, therefore, upon which I intend to admonish you, I mean the violation of your chastity;--a crime, however lightly it may be treated by debauched persons, very heinous in itself, and very dreadful in its consequences.
Laws in violation of private contracts, as they amount to aggressions on the rights of those States whose citizens are injured by them, may be considered as another probable source of hostility.
A list of the cases in which Congress have been betrayed, or forced by the defects of the Confederation, into violations of their chartered authorities, would not a little surprise those who have paid no attention to the subject; and would be no inconsiderable argument in favor of the new Constitution, which seems to have provided no less studiously for the lesser, than the more obvious and striking defects of the old.