violoncello


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Related to violoncello: cellist, Violin family, ARPA, cellos

vi·o·lon·cel·lo

 (vē′ə-lən-chĕl′ō, vī′ə-)
n. pl. vi·o·lon·cel·los
A cello.

[Italian, diminutive of violone, violone; see violone.]

vi′o·lon·cel′list n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

violoncello

(ˌvaɪələnˈtʃɛləʊ)
n, pl -los or -li
(Instruments) the full name for cello
[C18: from Italian, from violone + -cello, diminutive suffix]
ˌviolonˈcellist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cel•lo

(ˈtʃɛl oʊ)

n., pl. -los.
the second largest member of the violin family, rested vertically on the floor between the performer's knees when played; violoncello.
[1875–80; short for violoncello]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.violoncello - a large stringed instrumentvioloncello - a large stringed instrument; seated player holds it upright while playing
bowed stringed instrument, string - stringed instruments that are played with a bow; "the strings played superlatively well"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
كَمان جَهير الصَّوْت
violoncello
cello
violončelo
csellógordonka
selló
チェロ
čells
violončelo

violoncello

[ˌvaɪələnˈtʃeləʊ] Nviolonchelo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

violoncello

n (form)Violoncello nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

violoncello

(vaiələnˈtʃelou) noun
full form of cello.
ˌviolonˈcellist noun
full form of cellist.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Wemmick no longer unwound Wemmick's arm when it adapted itself to her figure, but sat in a high-backed chair against the wall, like a violoncello in its case, and submitted to be embraced as that melodious instrument might have done.
Even political principle must have been in danger of relaxation under such circumstances; and the violin, faithful to rotten boroughs, must have been tempted to fraternize in a demoralizing way with a reforming violoncello. In that case, the linnet-throated soprano and the full-toned bass singing,--
Skimpole could play on the piano and the violoncello, and he was a composer--had composed half an opera once, but got tired of it--and played what he composed with taste.
Skimpole played some fragments of his own compositions or when, both at the piano and the violoncello, and at our table, he preserved with an absence of all effort his delightful spirits and his easy flow of conversation, that Richard and I seemed to retain the transferred impression of having been arrested since dinner and that it was very curious altogether.
In the gallery opposite to the pulpit were a little choir of male and female singers, a violoncello, and a violin.
"Old Joshway," as he is irreverently called by his neighbours, is in a state of simmering indignation; but he has not yet opened his lips except to say, in a resounding bass undertone, like the tuning of a violoncello, "Sehon, King of the Amorites; for His mercy endureth for ever; and Og the King of Basan: for His mercy endureth for ever"--a quotation which may seem to have slight bearing on the present occasion, but, as with every other anomaly, adequate knowledge will show it to be a natural sequence.
As Elinor was neither musical, nor affecting to be so, she made no scruple of turning her eyes from the grand pianoforte, whenever it suited her, and unrestrained even by the presence of a harp, and violoncello, would fix them at pleasure on any other object in the room.
There, snuff and cigars, and German pipes and flutes, and violins and violoncellos, divide the supremacy between them.
Harmonic Gallery: For Vibraphone, Violin, Viola, Violoncello and Double Bass.
They recently recorded for the radio Jan Vaclav Hugo Vorisek's (1791-1825) Variations for violoncello and piano, op.9, and Philadelphia-based composer David Carpenter wrote them a piece called Romance.