virago


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vi·ra·go

 (və-rä′gō, -rā′-, vîr′ə-gō′)
n. pl. vi·ra·goes or vi·ra·gos
1. A woman regarded as noisy, scolding, or domineering.
2. A large, strong, courageous woman.

[Latin virāgō, from vir, man; see wī-ro- in Indo-European roots.]

vi·rag′i·nous (və-răj′ə-nəs) adj.

virago

(vɪˈrɑːɡəʊ)
n, pl -goes or -gos
1. a loud, violent, and ill-tempered woman; scold; shrew
2. archaic a strong, brave, or warlike woman; amazon
[Old English, from Latin: a manlike maiden, from vir a man]
viraginous adj
viˈrago-ˌlike adj

vi•ra•go

(vɪˈrɑ goʊ, -ˈreɪ-)

n., pl. -goes, -gos.
1. a loud-voiced, ill-tempered, scolding woman; shrew.
2. Archaic. a woman of strength or spirit.
[before 1000; Middle English, Old English < Latin virāgō=vir man + -āgō suffix expressing association of some kind, here resemblance]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.virago - a noisy or scolding or domineering womanvirago - a noisy or scolding or domineering woman
shrew, termagant - a scolding nagging bad-tempered woman
2.virago - a large strong and aggressive womanvirago - a large strong and aggressive woman
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"

virago

noun harridan, fury, shrew, vixen, scold, battle-axe (informal), termagant (rare), Xanthippe, ballbreaker (slang) Violent wives are too easily dismissed as hysterical, man-hating viragos.

virago

noun
A person, traditionally a woman, who persistently nags or criticizes:
Informal: battle-ax.
Translations

virago

[vɪˈrɑːgəʊ] N (viragoes or viragos (pl)) → fiera f, arpía f

virago

nXanthippe f

virago

[vɪˈrɑːgəʊ] n (frm, pej) → virago f
References in classic literature ?
It met its persecutor with a shriek, almost exactly like that of an angry virago.
To think that my love lay helpless there in the hands of those wretches; and to think that her lover lay helpless here in the supervision of this vile virago!
All he discovered was a strange, fat woman, a sort of virago, who had, apparently, been put in as a caretaker by the man of affairs.
"The poor creature, after all her sufferings," Emmy continued; "her horrid banker broken and run away; her husband--wicked wretch-- having deserted her and taken her child away from her" (here she doubled her two little fists and held them in a most menacing attitude before her, so that the Major was charmed to see such a dauntless virago) "the poor dear thing!
He paid two dollars and a half a month rent for the small room he got from his Portuguese landlady, Maria Silva, a virago and a widow, hard working and harsher tempered, rearing her large brood of children somehow, and drowning her sorrow and fatigue at irregular intervals in a gallon of the thin, sour wine that she bought from the corner grocery and saloon for fifteen cents.
It is the worst insult one virago can cast upon another in a moment of altercation.
Tess soon perceived as she walked in the flock, sometimes with this one, sometimes with that, that the fresh night air was producing staggerings and serpentine courses among then men who had partaken too freely; some of the more careless women also were wandering in their gait--to wit, a dark virago, Car Darch, dubbed Queen of Spades, till lately a favourite of d'Urberville's; Nancy, her sister, nicknamed the Queen of Diamonds; and the young married woman who had already tumbled down.
His own woman was of the party--a veritable giantess, a virago of the first magnitude--and she was evidently the only thing in the world of which Usanga stood in awe.
In this she was quite unlike the rest of the girls and women of the Folk, who were born viragos. She never made harsh, angry cries, and it seemed to be her nature to flee away from trouble rather than to remain and fight.
Books A Woman of No Importance Sonia Purnell Virago. Out now If the story of Virginia Hall had been a work of fiction it would be dismissed as far-fetched.
HOUSE OF GLASS by Susan Fletcher, Virago, PS16.99 (ebook PS8.99) ....
HOUSE OF GLASS by Susan Fletcher, Virago, PS16.99 (ebook PS8.99) HHHHH IT IS summer 1914, and life is changing for Clara Waterfield and England.