viscosity

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vis·cos·i·ty

 (vĭ-skŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. vis·cos·i·ties
1. The condition or property of being viscous.
2. Physics Coefficient of viscosity.

viscosity

(vɪsˈkɒsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or property of being viscous
2. (General Physics) physics
a. the extent to which a fluid resists a tendency to flow
b. Also called: absolute viscosity a measure of this resistance, equal to the tangential stress on a liquid undergoing streamline flow divided by its velocity gradient. It is measured in newton seconds per metre squared. Symbol: η See also kinematic viscosity, specific viscosity

vis•cos•i•ty

(vɪˈskɒs ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or quality of being viscous.
2.
a. the property of a fluid that resists the force tending to cause the fluid to flow.
b. the measure of the extent to which a fluid possesses this property.
[1375–1425]

vis·cos·i·ty

(vĭ-skŏs′ĭ-tē)
The resistance of a substance to flow. A substance that can flow easily has a low viscosity. A substance that cannot flow easily has a high viscosity.

viscosity

the quality or condition of being able to adhere to things. — viscous, adj.
See also: Materials, Properties of

viscosity

In fluids, the resistance to flow.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.viscosity - resistance of a liquid to shear forces (and hence to flow)
consistency, eubstance, consistence, body - the property of holding together and retaining its shape; "wool has more body than rayon"; "when the dough has enough consistency it is ready to bake"
stickiness - the property of sticking to a surface
sliminess - a property resembling or being covered with slime
glueyness, gluiness, gumminess, ropiness, tackiness, viscidity, viscidness, cohesiveness - the property of being cohesive and sticky
gelatinousness, glutinosity, glutinousness - the property of having a viscosity like jelly

viscosity

noun
The physical property of being viscous:
Translations
viskoosisuusviskositeetti

viscosity

[vɪsˈkɒsɪtɪ] Nviscosidad f

viscosity

[vɪsˈkɒsəti] nviscosité f

viscosity

nZähflüssigkeit f; (Phys) → Viskosität f

viscosity

[vɪsˈkɒsɪtɪ] nviscosità

vis·cos·i·ty

n. viscosidad, cualidad de ser viscoso, esp. la propiedad de los líquidos de no fluir libremente debido a la fricción de las moléculas.

viscosity

n (pl -ties) viscosidad f
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the bulk viscosity of epoxide monomer was thermal and volume deformation dependent [5], Aleman [6] used the same approach to investigate the dependence of the bulk viscosity on the elongational and shear viscosities of several thermoplastic polymers.
However, my experience tells me that they are not necessary because the viscosities of nearly all paints flatten out at considerably lower shear rates.
In case 2, we compute the viscosities of various binary mixtures (20:80, 40:60, 60:40 and 80:20) of the two representative diesel surrogates (n-hexadecane and n-decylbenzene).
The higher viscosity of vegetable oils compared to diesel fuel, is an inconvenient to use directly as fuels, the high viscosities of vegetable oils, are apparently responsible for premature injector, leading to poorer atomization [6].
The largest difference in viscosity between the two materials is observed at the lowest shear rate, and even at this point the ratio of the two viscosities is not quite 3.
The first type which refers to black oil type correlations predict viscosities from available field-measured variables include reservoir temperature, oil API gravity, solution gas-oil ratio, saturation pressure and pressure [1-9].
Higher chain amides such as oleamide DEA will generally build higher viscosities (on an equal active basis) than its coco counterpart but the foam stability will not be as good as that obtained by cocamide DEA.
Regardless of flow rate, the XL7 can measure viscosities over 10 million centipoise (100,000 poise) at pressures of 168 bar (2,500 psi) or more.
inh,i], for each solution are determined from the relative viscosities and from the concentrations, [C.
Measuring flow in fluids with viscosities above 100 cp requires special consideration by those charged with designing, operating and maintaining the equipment.
Using the "piston time-of-fall" method for measuring viscosities from 0.