vital capacity


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vital capacity

n.
The amount of air that can be forcibly expelled from the lungs after breathing in as deeply as possible.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vital capacity

n
(Physiology) physiol the volume of air that can be exhaled from the lungs after the deepest possible breath has been taken: a measure of lung function
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vi′tal capac′ity



n.
the greatest amount of air that can be forced from the lungs after maximum inhalation.
[1850–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

vital capacity

The amount of air expelled from the lungs after taking a deep breath.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vital capacity - the maximum amount of air that can be exhaled after a maximum inhalation (usually tested with a spirometer); used to determine the condition of lung tissue
diagnostic assay, diagnostic test - an assay conducted for diagnostic purposes
capacity, content - the amount that can be contained; "the gas tank has a capacity of 12 gallons"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors identified that exposure to inhalable cotton dust was associated with significant reduction in "Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Volume in First Second (FEV1)".
It is part of a larger study that analyzes the behavior of the slow vital capacity and the maximum phonation time of a research group of the cardiopulmonary laboratory of the University.
From their forced vital capacity, home cleaners lost an extra 4.3 milliliters a year and occupational cleaners lost an additional 7.1 milliliters a year.
Olivas, "Difference between the slow vital capacity and forced vital capacity: predictor of hyperinflation in patients with airflow obstruction," The Internet Journal of Pulmonary Medicine, vol.
Table 2 shows that the difference in mean values of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume at the end of first second ([FEV.sub.1]), and [FEV.sub.1]/FVC% in pregnant and non-pregnant women was not significant statistically (p > 0.05).
In case of rs3088308, all lung function variables were reduced in patients with a minor allele and the results for forced expiratory volume in 1 second (p=0.016), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (%) predicted (p=0.009), forced vital capacity (p=0.048) and forced vital capacity (%) predicted (p=0.048) were statistically significant.
Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second ([FEV.sub.1]), [FEV.sub.1]/FVC, forced expiratory flow (FEF25-75), FEF25, FEF50, FEF75 and peak expiratory flow were measured using forced expiratory values.
Several types of measurement are taken--for example, forced vital capacity (FVC) is the total amount of air that can forcibly be blown out after inhalation, while forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) is the amount of air that can be blown out in one second.
RESULTS : The mean forced vital capacity (FVC) in male sedentary subjects of 22-26yrs age group i.e., group A which is 4.46 ltrs [+ or -] 0.07 is compared with the mean forced vital capacity (FVC) of male physically active group B which is 4.98 [+ or -] 0.15 of age group 22-26yrs.
Researchers calculated a 95 percent confidence limit around the slopes of decline of ALSFRSr scores, forced vital capacity (FVC) and grip strength of the ProAct historical database subjects, and evaluated if trial subjects fell within or outside those limits.
(12) We evaluated the forced expiratory volume in one second ([FEV.sub.1]), the forced vital capacity (FVC), ratio of the forced expiratory volume in one second to the forced vital capacity ([FEV.sub.1]/FVC), and the forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% ([FEF.sub.25-75%]).
"There was no evidence that NAC slowed the progression of IPF or improved lung function, as measured by forced vital capacity, compared to placebo," says lead author Fernando Martinez, executive vice chair of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.