vital capacity


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

vital capacity

n.
The amount of air that can be forcibly expelled from the lungs after breathing in as deeply as possible.

vital capacity

n
(Physiology) physiol the volume of air that can be exhaled from the lungs after the deepest possible breath has been taken: a measure of lung function

vi′tal capac′ity



n.
the greatest amount of air that can be forced from the lungs after maximum inhalation.
[1850–55]

vital capacity

The amount of air expelled from the lungs after taking a deep breath.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vital capacity - the maximum amount of air that can be exhaled after a maximum inhalation (usually tested with a spirometer); used to determine the condition of lung tissue
diagnostic assay, diagnostic test - an assay conducted for diagnostic purposes
capacity, content - the amount that can be contained; "the gas tank has a capacity of 12 gallons"
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, the patients with increased supine GOR did not have lower vital capacity than those with normal supine GOR.
Pulmonary parameters such as tidal volume (TV), vital capacity (VC), forced VC (FVC), forced expiratory volume in first second ([FEV.
In 2014, we published an article [5] that may be of your interest carried out in hospitalized individuals: "use of the technique of counting numbers as a predictor of slow vital capacity in hospitalized Individuals".
15 The variables that were collected for each subject were the force vital capacity (FVC), force expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), FEV1 / FVC, vital capacity(VC), FEV1 / VC, and peak expiratory flow(PEF).
The patients were encouraged to perform the vital capacity breath maneuver and hold their breath.
for both immunosuppressive therapy and the treatment of sarcoidosis in general, we are going to see it more focused on patient-centered outcomes and quality of life rather than things that we'd all like to measure, like the vital capacity.
They found that children whose mothers received vitamin A instead of a placebo had a significantly greater forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1) and a greater forced vital capacity (FVC), while children whose mothers received beta-carotene instead of a placebo had similar FEV and FVC.
More specifically, the purpose of this study was to compare forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second as a percent of forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC%), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) values obtained during standing, sitting, forward sitting, supine, and prone positions.
Four patients show a significant slowing down of the linear decline of the forced vital capacity and of the ALS-FRS score.
Simple spirometry includes forced vital capacity (FVC), graphed as either a time-volume curve or as a flow- volume loop, slow vital capacity (SVC), and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV).
Waist circumference was found to be negatively associated with forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second, and the associations were unchanged by sex, age or BMI category (normal-weight, overweight and obese).
Patients who have never performed the forced vital capacity maneuver (FVC) rapidly climb a learning curve, leading to a quality effort.