vitamin K


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Related to vitamin K: vitamin E, vitamin D, Vitamin K Deficiency

vitamin K

n.
A fat-soluble vitamin, found in leafy green vegetables and some animal products and produced by intestinal bacteria, that plays an essential role in blood clotting. It exists in two main forms, K1 and K2.

[Abbreviation and partial translation of German K(oagulations)vitamin, coagulation vitamin, clotting vitamin, from Koagulation, coagulation, from Latin coāgulātiō, coāgulātiōn-, from coāgulāre, to curdle, coagulate; see coagulate.]

vitamin K1

n.
1. A yellow viscous oil, C31H46O2, found in leafy green vegetables and used by the body in the synthesis of prothrombin. Also called phylloquinone.
2. A synthetic analog of this vitamin, used in the treatment of some coagulation disorders and to prevent hemorrhagic disease in newborns. In veterinary medicine, it is used as an antidote to poisoning by anticoagulant rodenticides. Also called phytonadione.

vitamin K2

n.
Any of several fat-soluble compounds found in liver and other animal products and in some fermented foods and synthesized in the body by intestinal bacteria. Also called menaquinone.

vitamin K3

n.

vitamin K

n, pl K vitamins
(Elements & Compounds) any of the fat-soluble vitamins, including phylloquinone and the menaquinones, which are essential for the normal clotting of blood

vitamin K1


n.
a yellowish, oily, viscous liquid, C31H46O2, that occurs in leafy vegetables, rice, bran, and hog liver or is obtained esp. from alfalfa or putrefied sardine meat or synthesized and that promotes blood clotting by increasing the prothrombin content of the blood. Also called phylloquinone, phytonadione.
[1930–35]

vitamin K2


n.
a light yellow, crystalline solid, C41H56O2, having properties similar to those of vitamin K1.
[1935–40]

vitamin K3


n.
[1955–60]

vitamin K

Any of a group of vitamins important for normal clotting of the blood. Vitamin K is found in green leafy vegetables, pork, liver, and vegetable oils.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vitamin K - a fat-soluble vitamin that helps in the clotting of blood
fat-soluble vitamin - any vitamin that is soluble in fats
phylloquinone, phytonadione, vitamin K1 - a form of vitamin K
menadione, vitamin K3 - a form of vitamin K
References in periodicals archive ?
[USA], June 13 (ANI): Scientists have found that a low level of circulating vitamin K is associated with restricted mobility and disability in older adults.
Vitamin K may not be the first vitamin you think of when discussing bone health, but emerging research shows that it may be as important as calcium and vitamin D" in maintaining strong bones.
Studies show that vitamin D and vitamin K play an essential role in slowing--and even preventing--arterial stiffening.
Vitamin K was last in total channel volume, but grew a hearty 23.7% in the natural channel.
Don't ignore opportunities to provide tailored solutions; consider adding vitamin K, resveratrol, probiotics and other products of growing interest to consumers.
In 1929, a Danish researcher discovered the key to stanching blood flow, aptly naming it vitamin K, for "koagulation." By the end of the century, K's role in blood clotting remained its only claim to fame.
Vitamin K isn't a single vitamin, but a group of fat-soluble compounds found primarily in dark-green, leafy vegetables.
And this isn't merely because some of them contain calcium, but because they are the best sources of vitamin K.
* Get enough vitamin K. Vitamin K helps blood coagulate.
She is in the Vitamin K Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston.
While calcium is the primary nutrient involved, vitamin D, protein, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin C, vitamin K, and certain trace minerals also play significant roles in optimizing bone health (Strause et al., 1994).
Vitamin K, the blood-clotting vitamin, bears that nickname for good reason.