vitiate

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vi·ti·ate

 (vĭsh′ē-āt′)
tr.v. vi·ti·at·ed, vi·ti·at·ing, vi·ti·ates
1. To reduce the value or quality of; impair or spoil: "His famous compilation of norms was vitiated by a major sampling error" (Frederick Crews).
2. To corrupt morally; debase: "My anxieties ... still are great lest the numerous ... snares of vice should vitiate your early habits of virtue" (Abigail Adams). See Synonyms at corrupt.
3. To make ineffective (a contract or legal stipulation, for example); invalidate.

[Latin vitiāre, vitiāt-, from vitium, fault.]

vi′ti·a·ble (vĭsh′ē-ə-bəl) adj.
vi′ti·a′tion n.
vi′ti·a′tor n.

vitiate

(ˈvɪʃɪˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to make faulty or imperfect
2. to debase, pervert, or corrupt
3. (Law) to destroy the force or legal effect of (a deed, etc): to vitiate a contract.
[C16: from Latin vitiāre to injure, from vitium a fault]
ˈvitiable adj
ˌvitiˈation n
ˈvitiˌator n

vi•ti•ate

(ˈvɪʃ iˌeɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to impair the quality of; make faulty; spoil.
2. to impair or weaken the effectiveness of.
3. to debase; corrupt; pervert.
4. to make legally invalid; invalidate: to vitiate a claim.
[1525–35; < Latin vitiātus, past participle of vitiāre to spoil, derivative of vitium blemish, vice1]
vi`ti•a′tion, n.
vi′ti•a`tor, n.

vitiate

- "To make imperfect; spoil."
See also related terms for spoil.

vitiate


Past participle: vitiated
Gerund: vitiating

Imperative
vitiate
vitiate
Present
I vitiate
you vitiate
he/she/it vitiates
we vitiate
you vitiate
they vitiate
Preterite
I vitiated
you vitiated
he/she/it vitiated
we vitiated
you vitiated
they vitiated
Present Continuous
I am vitiating
you are vitiating
he/she/it is vitiating
we are vitiating
you are vitiating
they are vitiating
Present Perfect
I have vitiated
you have vitiated
he/she/it has vitiated
we have vitiated
you have vitiated
they have vitiated
Past Continuous
I was vitiating
you were vitiating
he/she/it was vitiating
we were vitiating
you were vitiating
they were vitiating
Past Perfect
I had vitiated
you had vitiated
he/she/it had vitiated
we had vitiated
you had vitiated
they had vitiated
Future
I will vitiate
you will vitiate
he/she/it will vitiate
we will vitiate
you will vitiate
they will vitiate
Future Perfect
I will have vitiated
you will have vitiated
he/she/it will have vitiated
we will have vitiated
you will have vitiated
they will have vitiated
Future Continuous
I will be vitiating
you will be vitiating
he/she/it will be vitiating
we will be vitiating
you will be vitiating
they will be vitiating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been vitiating
you have been vitiating
he/she/it has been vitiating
we have been vitiating
you have been vitiating
they have been vitiating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been vitiating
you will have been vitiating
he/she/it will have been vitiating
we will have been vitiating
you will have been vitiating
they will have been vitiating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been vitiating
you had been vitiating
he/she/it had been vitiating
we had been vitiating
you had been vitiating
they had been vitiating
Conditional
I would vitiate
you would vitiate
he/she/it would vitiate
we would vitiate
you would vitiate
they would vitiate
Past Conditional
I would have vitiated
you would have vitiated
he/she/it would have vitiated
we would have vitiated
you would have vitiated
they would have vitiated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.vitiate - corrupt morally or by intemperance or sensuality; "debauch the young people with wine and women"; "Socrates was accused of corrupting young men"; "Do school counselors subvert young children?"; "corrupt the morals"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
carnalise, sensualise, sensualize, carnalize - debase through carnal gratification
infect - corrupt with ideas or an ideology; "society was infected by racism"
lead astray, lead off - teach immoral behavior to; "It was common practice to lead off the young ones, and teach them bad habits"
poison - spoil as if by poison; "poison someone's mind"; "poison the atmosphere in the office"
bastardise, bastardize - change something so that its value declines; for example, art forms
suborn - incite to commit a crime or an evil deed; "He suborned his butler to cover up the murder of his wife"
2.vitiate - make imperfect; "nothing marred her beauty"
damage - inflict damage upon; "The snow damaged the roof"; "She damaged the car when she hit the tree"
defile, sully, taint, corrupt, cloud - place under suspicion or cast doubt upon; "sully someone's reputation"
blemish, deface, disfigure - mar or spoil the appearance of; "scars defaced her cheeks"; "The vandals disfigured the statue"
3.vitiate - take away the legal force of or render ineffective; "invalidate a contract"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"

vitiate

verb
1. spoil, mar, undermine, impair, injure, harm, devalue, water down, blemish, invalidate electoral abuses which could vitiate the entire voting process
2. corrupt, contaminate, pollute, pervert, blight, taint, sully, deprave, debase, defile His otherwise admirable character is vitiated by his pride.

vitiate

verb
1. To spoil the soundness or perfection of:
2. To ruin utterly in character or quality:
3. To put an end to, especially formally and with authority:
Translations

vitiate

[ˈvɪʃɪeɪt] VT (frm) (= weaken) → afectar negativamente; (= spoil) → estropear, arruinar; (= devalue) → quitar valor a (Jur) [+ contract, deed] → invalidar

vitiate

[ˈvɪʃieɪt] vtvicier

vitiate

vt
(= spoil) air, bloodverunreinigen
(Jur etc: = invalidate) → ungültig machen; thesiswiderlegen; meeting, decision, agreementaufheben

vitiate

[ˈvɪʃɪˌeɪt] vt (frm) (all senses) → viziare

vitiate

v. viciar; infectar.
References in periodicals archive ?
Merseytravel supremo Neil Scalextricthinks a charge would be stupid and alienate vitiators.
Central to the teachings in the Caraka- and Susruta Samhitas is an etiology based on three humors or dosas, wind (vata, vayu), bile (pitta), and phlegm (kapha, slesman), which, much as in Hippocratic and Galenic medicine, acted as vitiators by disrupting the normal functioning of the body.