vitreous

(redirected from vitreous floater)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

vit·re·ous

 (vĭt′rē-əs)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, resembling, or having the nature of glass; glassy.
2. Obtained or made from glass.
3. Of or relating to the vitreous humor.
n.
The vitreous humor.

[From Latin vitreus, from vitrum, glass.]

vit′re·os′i·ty (-ŏs′ĭ-tē), vit′re·ous·ness (-əs-nĭs) n.

vitreous

(ˈvɪtrɪəs)
adj
1. (Elements & Compounds) of, relating to, or resembling glass
2. (Elements & Compounds) made of, derived from, or containing glass
3. (Anatomy) of or relating to the vitreous humour or vitreous body
[C17: from Latin vitreus made of glass, from vitrum glass; probably related to vidēre to see]
ˈvitreously adv

vit•re•ous

(ˈvɪ tri əs)

adj.
1. of the nature of or resembling glass, as in transparency, brittleness, hardness, or glossiness: vitreous china.
2. of or pertaining to glass.
3. obtained from or containing glass.
[1640–50; < Latin vitreus=vitr(um) glass + -eus -eous]
vit′re•ous•ly, adv.

vit·re·ous

(vĭt′rē-əs)
Relating to or resembling glass; glassy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.vitreous - of or relating to or constituting the vitreous humor of the eyevitreous - of or relating to or constituting the vitreous humor of the eye; "the vitreous chamber"
2.vitreous - relating to or resembling or derived from or containing glass; "vitreous rocks"; "vitreous silica"
3.vitreous - (of ceramics) having the surface made shiny and nonporous by fusing a vitreous solution to itvitreous - (of ceramics) having the surface made shiny and nonporous by fusing a vitreous solution to it; "glazed pottery"; "glassy porcelain"; "hard vitreous china used for plumbing fixtures"
ceramics - the art of making and decorating pottery
shiny, glazed - having a shiny surface or coating; "glazed fabrics"; "glazed doughnuts"
Translations

vitreous

[ˈvɪtrɪəs] ADJvítreo

vitreous

[ˈvɪtriəs] adj [china, enamel] → vitrifié(e)

vitreous

adjGlas-; vitreous chinaPorzellanemail nt; vitreous enamelGlasemail nt

vitreous

[ˈvɪtrɪəs] adj (china, enamel) → vetrificato/a; (rock) → vetroso/a

vit·re·ous

n. fluído semejante a gelatina que llena el interior del ojo; vítreo-a, vidrioso-a, casi transparente, hialino;
___ chambercámara ___;
___ bodycuerpo ___;
___ humorhumor ___.

vitreous

adj vítreo
References in periodicals archive ?
They also believe the enzymes could scavenge free radicals which could result in hyaluronic acid degradation and vitreous floater formation.
Post-operative mild iritis was seen in 3 cases, glare in 3 cases, vitreous floater in 4 cases, and pitting over IOL in 6 cases.
There are possibilities that psychological factors might be associated with floater symptoms; however, psychological analyses on symptomatic vitreous floater patients are scarce.
This is done to move a vitreous floater off the visual axis.
"Vitreous floaters are extremely common and occur as people age, but they can be more profound in patients with diabetes, nearsightedness, ocular inflammation, or hemorrhage in the eye.
Media opacities such as cataract and vitreous floaters may limit how well you can optimise the image.
The most frequent ocular adverse events (equal to or greater than 5% of patients in any treatment arm) were reduced visual acuity, conjunctival hemorrhage, vitreous floaters and eye pain 4 .
These will include Vitrocap for vitreous floaters and Macu-Save, an easy-to-swallow supplement that offers added protection against macular degeneration, the leading cause of severe vision loss in people over 60 as well as other food supplements and medical devices.
The most common adverse effects (frequency of 5% or more) reported in EYLEA-treated patients included conjunctival hemorrhage, eye pain, cataract, vitreous detachment, vitreous floaters, and increased intraocular pressure.
A FLOATERS or vitreous floaters are small, cloudy particles in the jelly-like fluid that fills the eyeball.
Margaret Johnson of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, wrote to you about having vitreous floaters in the July/ August 2006 issue of The Saturday Evening Post.
As we age, degenerative changes occur, and in the eye, the vitreous gel can liquefy, creating vitreous floaters of different sizes and varying degrees of density.