vivacity


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vi·vac·i·ty

 (vĭ-văs′ĭ-tē, vī-)
n.
The quality or condition of being vivacious; liveliness: an energetic marching band that gave vivacity to the parade.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vivacity

(vɪˈvæsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the quality or condition of being vivacious
2. (often plural) rare a vivacious act or expression
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vi•vac•i•ty

(vɪˈvæs ɪ ti, vaɪ-)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the quality or state of being vivacious.
2. a vivacious act or statement.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vivacity - characterized by high spirits and animationvivacity - characterized by high spirits and animation
high-spiritedness - exuberant liveliness
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

vivacity

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

vivacity

noun
A lively, emphatic, eager quality or manner:
Informal: ginger, pep, peppiness.
Slang: oomph.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

vivacity

[vɪˈvæsɪtɪ] Nvivacidad f, animación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

vivacity

[vɪˈvæsəti] nvivacité f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

vivacity

nLebhaftigkeit f; (of style)Lebendigkeit f; (of smile, laugh)Munterkeit f, → Aufgewecktheit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

vivacity

[vɪˈvæsɪtɪ] nvivacità
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
On the other side, heat and vivacity in age, is an excellent composition for business.
She has her mother's charm and grace and good heart and sense of justice, and she has her father's vivacity and cheerfulness and pluck and spirit of enterprise, with the affectionate disposition and sincerity of both parents.
Poyser answering for the rest with unwonted vivacity of tongue, for he had all the appropriate wedding-day jokes at his command.
But while now upon so wide a field thus variously accomplished, and with such liveliness of expertness in him, too; all this would seem to argue some uncommon vivacity of intelligence.
The company broke up reluctantly, and drifted toward their several homes, chatting with vivacity and all agreeing that it would be many a long day before Dawson's Landing would see the equal of this one again.
The idea soon reached to conviction, as she observed his increasing civilities toward herself, and heard his frequent attempt at a compliment on her wit and vivacity; and though more astonished than gratified herself by this effect of her charms, it was not long before her mother gave her to understand that the probability of their marriage was extremely agreeable to HER.
He is healthy, but not robust, full of gentle playfulness and vivacity, already affectionate, and susceptible of passions and emotions it will be long ere he can find words to express.
No wonder then, as so much spirits must be required to support any vivacity in these scenes of dulness, that we hear persons of fashion eternally complaining of the want of them; a complaint confined entirely to upper life.
The children of the poor are therefore allowed to "feel" from their earliest years, and they gain thereby a precocity and an early vivacity which contrast at first most favourably with the inert, undeveloped, and listless behaviour of the half-instructed youths of the Polygonal class; but when the latter have at last completed their University course, and are prepared to put their theory into practice, the change that comes over them may almost be described as a new birth, and in every art, science, and social pursuit they rapidly overtake and distance their Triangular competitors.
I should like to have seen a gallery of coronation beauties, at Westminster Abbey, confronted for a moment by this band of island girls; their stiffness, formality, and affectation, contrasted with the artless vivacity and unconcealed natural graces of these savage maidens.
Then, indeed, does she captivate all hearts by her condescension, by her girlish vivacity, and by her skipping about as in the days when the hideous old general with the mouth too full of teeth had not cut one of them at two guineas each.
Brooke was nodding in a nap, she returned to the subject with renewed vivacity.