vivisectionist


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viv·i·sec·tion

 (vĭv′ĭ-sĕk′shən, vĭv′ĭ-sĕk′-)
n.
The act or practice of cutting into or otherwise injuring living animals for the purpose of scientific research.

[Latin vīvus, alive; see vivify + (dis)section.]

viv′i·sec′tion·al adj.
viv′i·sec′tion·al·ly adv.
viv′i·sec′tion·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vivisectionist

(ˌvɪvɪˈsɛkʃənɪst)
n
1. (Zoology) a person who practises vivisection
2. a person who advocates the practice of vivisection as being useful or necessary to science
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

viv•i•sec•tion•ist

(ˌvɪv əˈsɛk ʃə nɪst)

n.
a person who practices or favors vivisection.
[1875–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vivisectionist - a biologist who cuts open live animals for research
biologist, life scientist - (biology) a scientist who studies living organisms
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

vivisectionist

[ˌvɪvɪˈsekʃənɪst] Nvivisector(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
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Or else he probes them with the cruel hand of a vivisectionist, groping about in their mental processes and examining their souls as though to see of what soul-stuff is made.
Vincent Brim, but ends up under the tutelage of the renowned vivisectionist, Dr.
With the nurses and carers you were sort of willing them to win, whereas the vivisectionist and abattoir worker maybe not so much.
"Martin Amis is at his most compelling as a satiric vivisectionist with a cool eye and an unwavering scalpel," wrote Joyce Carol Oates in the New Yorker.
These concern a child who smilingly kills an ant; a hunter who kills for sport; a vivisectionist; and the mercy-killing of a wounded animal.
Is the vivisectionist's callousness more egregious than the natural historian's myopia or the astronomer's farsightedness because his discoveries have more immediate medical and social ramifications?
form," (2) a supreme analyst and vivisectionist whose psychological
Magendie, who began his formal medical training in 1801 at the Ecole de Medecine in Paris, and would go on to become full professor at the College de France, as well as a distinguished member of the Academie des Sciences, was the first to gain a reputation in Britain as a ruthless vivisectionist. He criticized Bichat in the journal of the Societe Medicale d'Emulation, but nonetheless adopted his routine of deliberately injuring the experimental subject for his research on the nervous and digestive systems.
Taking a similar approach to vivisection, the author shows how a nonanthropocentric approach can lead in new critical directions, for example, to an examination of Victor's latent nonhuman nature and to a correlation between the nineteenth-century positivist creator and the vivisectionist experimenter.
He makes Prendick attempt, and fail, to read "a crib of Horace" in order to tolerate the cry of the vivisectionist's victim (90).
Moreau, Woolf's psychiatrist plays a kind of cultural vivisectionist, who extends his medical expertise to a doctrine of social governance rooted in evolutionary ideas of harmony and balance, or, as he explains, "proportion": "Worshipping proportion, Sir William not only prospered himself but made England prosper, secluded her lunatics, forbade childbirth, penalised despair, made it impossible for the unfit to propagate their views until they, too, shared his sense of proportion" (97).
The Woman in Black isn't especially scary, but it keeps you on edge, and without the usual vivisectionist imagery.