vocabulary

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vo·cab·u·lar·y

 (vō-kăb′yə-lĕr′ē)
n. pl. vo·cab·u·lar·ies
1. All the words of a language.
2. The sum of words used by, understood by, or at the command of a particular person or group.
3. A list of words and often phrases, usually arranged alphabetically and defined or translated; a lexicon or glossary.
4. A supply of expressive means; a repertoire of communication: a dancer's vocabulary of movement.

[French vocabulaire, from Old French, from Medieval Latin vocābulārium, from neuter of vocābulārius, of words, from Latin vocābulum, name; see vocable.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vocabulary

(vəˈkæbjʊlərɪ)
n, pl -laries
1. (Linguistics) a listing, either selective or exhaustive, containing the words and phrases of a language, with meanings or translations into another language; glossary
2. (Linguistics) the aggregate of words in the use or comprehension of a specified person, class, profession, etc
3. (Linguistics) all the words contained in a language
4. a range or system of symbols, qualities, or techniques constituting a means of communication or expression, as any of the arts or crafts: a wide vocabulary of textures and colours.
[C16: from Medieval Latin vocābulārium, from vocābulārius concerning words, from Latin vocābulum vocable]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vo•cab•u•lar•y

(voʊˈkæb yəˌlɛr i)

n., pl. -lar•ies.
1. the stock of words used by or known to a particular person or group.
2. a list or collection of words and often phrases, usu. arranged in alphabetical order and defined.
3. the words of a language.
4. any collection of signs or symbols constituting a means or system of nonverbal communication.
5. the set of forms, techniques, or other means of expression available to or characteristic of an artist, art form, etc.
[1525–35; < Medieval Latin vocābulārium, n. use of neuter of vocābulārius of words = Latin vocābul(um) vocable + -ārius -ary]
vo•cab′u•lar`ied, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Vocabulary

 a collection or list of words, 1532.
Examples: vocabulary of arms, 1862; of new denominations, 1821; of dishes, 1825; a vocabulary to the understanding, 1662.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

vocabulary

All of the words and phrases used in a language or by a person, or a listing of some of these.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vocabulary - a listing of the words used in some enterprisevocabulary - a listing of the words used in some enterprise
wordbook - a reference book containing words (usually with their meanings)
2.vocabulary - a language user's knowledge of wordsvocabulary - a language user's knowledge of words
cognition, knowledge, noesis - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
language, speech - the mental faculty or power of vocal communication; "language sets homo sapiens apart from all other animals"
3.vocabulary - the system of techniques or symbols serving as a means of expression (as in arts or crafts); "he introduced a wide vocabulary of techniques"
artistic creation, artistic production, art - the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully"
frame of reference, frame - a system of assumptions and standards that sanction behavior and give it meaning
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

vocabulary

noun
1. language, words, lexicon, word stock, word hoard Children need to read to improve their vocabularies.
2. wordbook, dictionary, glossary, lexicon I could not find this word in my small Italian-English vocabulary.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

vocabulary

noun
1. All the words of a language:
2. An alphabetical list of words often defined or translated:
3. Specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
كَلِماتمَجْموع كَلِمات اللغَهمُعْجَممفرداتمُفْرَدات
slovní zásobaslovníčekslovníkslova
ordforrådordlisteterminologiord
sanavarastosanasto
rječnik
szójegyzékszókincs
orîorîaforîiorîasafn
語彙語彙集用語
어휘
vārdnīcavārdu krājums
slovná zásoba
besedni zakladbesednjak
ordförråd
คำศัพท์
kelime dağarcığıkelimelersözcük dağarcığısözlükçe
từ vựng

vocabulary

[vəʊˈkæbjʊlərɪ] N
1. [of person, language, subject] → vocabulario m, léxico m
a new word in the German vocabularyuna palabra nueva en el vocabulario or léxico alemán
2. (= glossary) → glosario m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

vocabulary

[vəʊˈkæbjʊləri] n
[person] → vocabulaire m
[language] → vocabulaire m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

vocabulary

nWortschatz m, → Vokabular nt (geh); (in textbook) → Wörterverzeichnis f; he has a limited vocabularyer hat einen beschränkten Wortschatz; the vocabulary of the legal professiondas Vokabular der Juristen; vocabulary bookVokabelheft nt; (printed) → Vokabelbuch nt; vocabulary test (Sch) → Vokabelarbeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

vocabulary

[vəʊˈkæbjʊlərɪ] n (gen) → vocabolario; (in textbook) → vocabolario, dizionario
we have to learn all the new vocabulary → dobbiamo imparare tutti i vocaboli nuovi
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

vocabulary

(vəˈkӕbjuləri) plural voˈcabularies noun
1. words in general. This book contains some difficult vocabulary.
2. (the stock of) words known and used eg by one person, or within a particular trade or profession. He has a vocabulary of about 20,000 words; the specialized vocabulary of nuclear physics.
3. a list of words in alphabetical order with meanings eg added as a supplement to a book dealing with a particular subject. This edition of Shakespeare's plays has a good vocabulary at the back.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

vocabulary

مُفْرَدات slovní zásoba ordforråd Vokabular λεξιλόγιο vocabulario sanavarasto vocabulaire rječnik vocabolario 語彙 어휘 vocabulaire ordforråd słownictwo vocabulário словарь ordförråd คำศัพท์ sözcük dağarcığı từ vựng 词汇
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

vocabulary

n. vocabulario.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
But in Jerry's vocabulary, "Mister Haggin" possessed all the definiteness of sound and meaning that the word "master" possesses in the vocabularies of humans in relation to their dogs.
Anything and everything would enter into them, for my father would say that I was an utter dunce at the French language; that the head mistress of my school was a stupid, common sort of women who cared nothing for morals; that he (my father) had not yet succeeded in obtaining another post; that Lamonde's "Grammar" was a wretched book--even a worse one than Zapolski's; that a great deal of money had been squandered upon me; that it was clear that I was wasting my time in repeating dialogues and vocabularies; that I alone was at fault, and that I must answer for everything.
In "Political Vocabularies: FDR, the Clergy Letters, and the Elements of Political Argument" Mary E.
Heterogeneity among sensor data products vocabulary could be handled by the use of standard control vocabularies. Data managers, scientists, and others in the marine science community are working with controlled vocabularies.
As we can see in Figure 1, the vocabularies marked with red line are keywords in the current page.
The relationship between passive and active vocabularies: effects of language learning context.
The main tasks in writing a business vocabulary are as follows: to unify business vocabularies of various organization departments; identify synonyms; synchronize the verbosity used in the business activities.
It is so fundamental that it is often assumed that we all possess adequate vocabularies; yet many do not and struggle to gain what is taken for granted.
In other words, children with larger vocabularies tend to learn new words at a faster pace when compared to children with smaller vocabularies.
It was further revealed that for those with stronger passage sight vocabularies, the role of passage sight vocabulary in the perception of ease in lexical inferencing depended on the degree of familiarity with the topic.
In addition, incidental vocabulary learning research manifested itself in the investigation of the role of modified input and output in the incidental process of word meaning (Ellis & He, 1999), measuring the frequency of exposure to new vocabularies and its influence on incidental vocabulary learning (Rott, 1999), incidental vocabulary learning through listening comparing to reading (Vidal, 2011), L2 vocabulary acquisition through negotiated interaction (Luan & Sappathy, 2011) and last but not least, the relationship between dictionary use and glossing and incidental vocabulary learning (Hulstijn, Hollander, & Greidanus, 1996; Roby, 1999; Yoshii, 2006; Lin & Huang, 2008).
According to Jalongo and Sobolak (2011), "There is strong evidence that the home and school environment exert a powerful influence on both the size and depth of children's vocabularies" (p.