vocal tract


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vocal tract

n.
The airway used in the production of speech, especially the passage above the larynx, including the pharynx, mouth, and nasal cavities.
References in periodicals archive ?
The increase in speed rai s es the resonant frequency of our vocal tract, causing the sound to change.
A speculative chapter then explores possible applications for nutraceutical manipulation for voice health, followed by chapters discussing laryngeal function during phonation, vocal tract resonance, chaos in voice research, dynamical disorders of voice, and the voice and forensics.
The resonance chamber and amplifier of the voice is the vocal tract, which includes the back of the throat (pharynx), the tongue, the palate, the mouth, the back of the nose (nasopharynx), the sinuses, and the head.
Before then, they argue, neck bones were too short to allow a full range of speech sounds from the vocal tract.
At the top of their range, they consistently adjusted the resonance of their vocal tract to match the frequency of their singing.
Both the shape of the vocal tract and the geometry of the lower pharynx contribute to the sound.
Different configurations of the vocal tract filter this source signal in a variety of complex ways, which results in different resonant frequencies for different speech sounds.
CD-ROM includes modules called The Vocal Tract, Speech Sounds, Phonation Modes, Airstream Mechanisms, and Acoustic Analysis, and also includes a
Six appendices are included on "Laryngeal Structure and Function," "The Structure and Mechanics of the Breath Apparatus," "The Physiology of the Vocal Tract Resonator System," "The Physical Factors of Vocal Registration," "Influences of Various Voices and Unvoiced Consonants on Resonator Adjustment" and "International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) Symbols." Glossaries on nonmusical and vocal terms are included, as well as a very extended bibliography on articles and books.
Mainly physical factors, such as the length of the vocal tract (the distance from the larynx to the lips) and vocal cords.
It is not uncommon to have excess phlegm in the vocal tract causing one to cough.
According to Richard Mammone, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and the principle investigator of the research project, what makes a voice unique are the physical attributes of the speaker's vocal tract and how he or she uses it.