voivode


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voivode

(ˈvɔɪvəʊd)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a variant of vaivode
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Who was it but one of my own race who as Voivode crossed the Danube and beat the Turk on his own ground?
The brightest century of Moldavian painting was coming to an end; it was renowned for its frescoes that adorned the churches' external walls when the voivode Vasile Lupu and the holy metropolitan Varlaam were finishing building and painting the ruler's church of the new monastery whose patrons were the "Three Holy Hierarchs".
Military assistance in the event of an emergency may be granted at the request of the competent regional authorities, based on the consent of the head of the province (the equivalent of the voivode in Poland).
In an act (11) of then voivode of Wallachia, Matei Basarab, it was mentioned that the entire community was freed from serfdom through a collective payment of 3000 gold coins (Raujescu, 1937[2014], p.
Its setting is 15th-century Wallachia and it is based on the life of Vlad II, voivode of Wallachia and member of the knightly Order of the Dragon, his children Vlad III, the Impaler (supposedly Stoker's inspiration for Dracula), reimagined as the vicious Lada, and her brother Radu, a vulnerable, beautiful dreamer.
(9) To the most important one can include: the Minister of the Environment, General Director of Environmental Protection, Voivode, Regional Director of Environment Protection, District head, Vogt, Mayor and President of the city, who are ahead of their institutions formally responsible for nature protection.
Hence, the outlines of the core of the city emerged during the reign of voivode Petru Musat, around the royal court and extended to the area delimited by the Royal Seat fortress and Miraufi church.
This makes him a conventional Orthodox clergyman, while the prince (voivode) of the country was a Catholic.
While we might at first assume that Vayvode represents the proper name of a character about whom nothing further can be known, the unfamiliar word vaivode (or voivode, ultimately from an old Slavonic title for a military leader) was used in the Renaissance to denote 'a local ruler or official in various parts of south-eastern Europe (in older use esp.