voluntarism

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vol·un·ta·rism

 (vŏl′ən-tə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1. The use of or reliance on voluntary action to maintain an institution, carry out a policy, or achieve an end.
2. A theory or doctrine that regards the will as the fundamental principle of the individual or of the universe.

vol′un·ta·rist n.
vol′un·ta·ris′tic adj.

voluntarism

(ˈvɒləntəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that the will rather than the intellect is the ultimate principle of reality
2. a doctrine or system based on voluntary participation in a course of action
3. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the belief that the state, government, and the law should not interfere with the procedures of collective bargaining and of trade union organization
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another name for voluntaryism
ˈvoluntarist n, adj
ˌvoluntaˈristic adj

vol•un•ta•rism

(ˈvɒl ən təˌrɪz əm)

n.
1. any theory that regards will as the fundamental agency or principle, in metaphysics, epistemology, or psychology.
2. the principle or practice of supporting schools, hospitals, churches, etc., by voluntary contributions or aid instead of relying on government assistance.
3. any policy based on voluntary action.
[1830–40]
vol′un•ta•rist, n., adj.
vol`un•ta•ris′tic, adj.

voluntarism

any theory that regards the will rather than the intellect as the fundamental agency or principle in human activities and experience, as Nietzscheism. — voluntarist, n.voluntaristic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
Translations

voluntarism

[ˈvɒləntərɪzəm] Nvoluntariado m

voluntarism

n no plVoluntarismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Wolff did not therefore follow the voluntarist tradition of natural law, which was characteristic of Germany's two other famous natural jurists of the early Enlightenment--Samuel Pufendorf and Christian Thomasius.
In doing this, Traherne defines Christ's immanence in the universe "against voluntarist and emerging 'mechanical' philosophies, delighting instead in the penetrative powers of 'Life it self'" (87-88).
Most agree that Scotus is a voluntarist of some kind.
Virtue ethics is a rational ethics, while the prevailing approach among modern philosophers, starting with Hume, turned human ends into an irrational matter, addressing ethical problems according to consequentialist, sensist, emotivist, or voluntarist criteria.
It is a fact that Malthus did not pay as much attention in the first version of the Essay as in later versions to the obligation to conform to the commands of God as disclosed in Revelation, but can this be taken as evidence that in this regard his theology had evolved, and that the voluntarist additions by Malthus in 1817 were presented as an alternative to consequentialism and as an ethical criterion that supersedes consequentialism?
Key characteristics of a successful and truly voluntarist siting process include community consent, continuous engagement with the local community throughout the duration of the project, and a flexible time frame.
One of the biggest problems giving rise to diverging readings of Levinas is the tendency to map his discourse onto superficially similar views that are actually more voluntarist or decisionist (i.e., "existentialist").
In fact what may look like incoherence is really the visible sign of a fundamental shift in Mailer's thinking from an ideological to a voluntarist conception of power.
The heavy demands of industrialized major wars of the twentieth century prompted campaigns, from above and from below, to get local and often voluntarist society to pull its weight actively, to dig for victory, buy war bonds, melt down church bells, and knit socks, to make material sacrifices.
We must now take a brief detour into Murphy's critique of both the natural law and theological voluntarist accounts of moral laws, which is needed to clear the field of rival accounts.
Indeed, the precise mechanisms of countersubversion in this early period remain cloudy and the agency of the lead actors unclear: how were the Wilsonians in the government the "ringleaders" when the voluntarist groups conducted their countersubversion "in the name of the government but without official sanction." (20-21) In addition there are factual errors that are distracting: it was Andrea Salsedo, not Roberto Elia, who fell to his death from the window of the Justice Department office in New York in 1920 (57); the Sedition Act was still legislatively applicable in 1919 because it was not repealed until December 1920 (60); and the pope's words are only considered infallible when he speaks ex cathedra.
Both works show voluntarist as well as rationalist characteristics, she says, which only demonstrates that he developmed an account that cannot be forced into the twofold framework of voluntarism and rationalism.