voluntarism

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vol·un·ta·rism

 (vŏl′ən-tə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1. The use of or reliance on voluntary action to maintain an institution, carry out a policy, or achieve an end.
2. A theory or doctrine that regards the will as the fundamental principle of the individual or of the universe.

vol′un·ta·rist n.
vol′un·ta·ris′tic adj.

voluntarism

(ˈvɒləntəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that the will rather than the intellect is the ultimate principle of reality
2. a doctrine or system based on voluntary participation in a course of action
3. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the belief that the state, government, and the law should not interfere with the procedures of collective bargaining and of trade union organization
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another name for voluntaryism
ˈvoluntarist n, adj
ˌvoluntaˈristic adj

vol•un•ta•rism

(ˈvɒl ən təˌrɪz əm)

n.
1. any theory that regards will as the fundamental agency or principle, in metaphysics, epistemology, or psychology.
2. the principle or practice of supporting schools, hospitals, churches, etc., by voluntary contributions or aid instead of relying on government assistance.
3. any policy based on voluntary action.
[1830–40]
vol′un•ta•rist, n., adj.
vol`un•ta•ris′tic, adj.

voluntarism

any theory that regards the will rather than the intellect as the fundamental agency or principle in human activities and experience, as Nietzscheism. — voluntarist, n.voluntaristic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
Translations

voluntarism

[ˈvɒləntərɪzəm] Nvoluntariado m

voluntarism

n no plVoluntarismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Beito then eviscerates silly progressive canards regarding the causes of the Great Depression, such as underconsumption/overproduction theory, the effectiveness of the New Deal, and the ineffectiveness of fraternais and other voluntaristic or self-help institutions.
The content of norms is determined by the will of those lawmakers, against the background of a legal system the characteristics of which are essentially voluntaristic. This voluntaristic notion is not the only sense, however, in which the Jesuits thought of law.
In particular, the way that aspiration is typically framed in conjunction with voluntaristic notions of a free-floating subject - someone who is schooled onto stable and productive career lines that are neither too grand or "unrealistic" for what are defined as his or her capacities, nor insufficiently ambitious and relevant to the needs of society and the demands of knowledge economy job markets.
For instance, she characterised the hunger strike as an effective method for defending the voluntaristic individual.
By contrast, the Nordic countries have maintained a more voluntaristic, agreement-based approach to collective bargaining, although they have also introduced more company-level bargaining within a centralised framework (Campos Lima and Jorgensen, 2016).
However, Warde argues that its lop-sided focus on the "conspicuous" aspects of consumer behaviour has congealed into a voluntaristic model of action premised on "an active, expressive, choosing consumer, motivated by concerns for personal identity and a fashioned lifestyle" (4).
Tombs endorses historian Jose Harris's contention that since the Second World War Britain, once "one of the most localized and voluntaristic countries in Europe," has become "one of the most centralized and bureaucratic." "European integration," Tombs writes, "pushed English and British law and institutions--now often presented as embarrassingly archaic and ripe for modernization'--towards alignment with Continental norms." Less emphasis was placed on the soft compulsion of culture and manners in the promotion of civil order; England joined the rest of the world in becoming ever more reliant on the harder coercion of a rapidly metastasizing statute book and a pervasive administrative bureaucracy--that "giant power," as Honore de Balzac called it, "wielded by pygmies."
The latter thesis is crucial for understanding the development of voluntaristic theories in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, insofar as it was taken by the advocates of such theories to embody a form of moral "necessitarianism" that was too restrictive of the power of the will.
We must be careful not to slip into the voluntaristic error, i.e.
By the time he completed his dissertation in 1953, he was steeped in the writings of the Chicago School, the sociology of Max Weber and the German methodological debates that framed his work and that of Simmel and others, the development of Emile Durkheim's sociology, leading to the breakthroughs in The Elementary Forms of Religious Life, Freud's work and the development of psychoanalysis generally, the existentialism of Sartre and Camus and of course the full complement of writings concerning Parsons' voluntaristic theory of action and the reactions to it by Merton and others.
Volkerpsychologie reflected this optimism, seeing the nation not as a fixed racial or ethnic entity, but as voluntaristic, open-ended, and evolving.
Carneiro places his theory of political evolution in broader context by categorizing it as a "coercive" theory, in contrast to "voluntaristic" ones; the latter, he says, invariably founder on "the demonstrated inability of autonomous political units to relinquish their sovereignty in the absence of overriding external constraints" (Carneiro, 1970, p.