vomiting

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vom·it

 (vŏm′ĭt)
v. vom·it·ed, vom·it·ing, vom·its
v.intr.
1. To eject part or all of the contents of the stomach through the mouth, usually in a series of involuntary spasmic movements.
2. To be discharged forcefully and abundantly; spew or gush: The dike burst, and the floodwaters vomited forth.
v.tr.
1. To eject (contents of the stomach) through the mouth.
2. To eject or discharge in a gush; spew out: The volcano vomited lava and ash.
n.
1. The act or an instance of ejecting matter from the stomach through the mouth.
2. Matter ejected from the stomach through the mouth.
3. An emetic.

[Middle English vomiten, from Latin vomitāre, frequentative of vomere; see wemə- in Indo-European roots.]

vom′it·er n.

vomiting

(ˈvɒmɪtɪŋ)
n
(Medicine) med the act of ejecting the contents of the stomach through the mouth as the result of involuntary muscular spasms of the stomach and oesophagus
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vomiting - the reflex act of ejecting the contents of the stomach through the mouthvomiting - the reflex act of ejecting the contents of the stomach through the mouth
ejection, forcing out, expulsion, projection - the act of expelling or projecting or ejecting
rumination - regurgitation of small amounts of food; seen in some infants after feeding
haematemesis, hematemesis - vomiting blood
hyperemesis - severe and excessive vomiting
Translations

vomiting

[ˈvɒmɪtɪŋ] Nvómito m

vomiting

[ˈvɒmɪtɪŋ] nvomissements mpl

vomiting

[ˈvɒmɪtɪŋ] nvomito

vom·it·ing

n. manifestación de vómitos.
excessive___hiperémesis;
___ in pregnancyhiperémesis gravitarum.

vomiting

n vómito (frec. pl), (el) vomitar
References in classic literature ?
Almost simultaneously they commenced vomiting. They couldn't suggest any explanation for it.
There were some in tears; some raging and tearing themselves, as if they had been in the greatest agonies of sorrow; some stark raving and downright lunatic; some ran about the ship stamping with their feet, others wringing their hands; some were dancing, some singing, some laughing, more crying, many quite dumb, not able to speak a word; others sick and vomiting; several swooning and ready to faint; and a few were crossing themselves and giving God thanks.
X was all stir and bustle when we entered it; we left the clean streets where there were dwelling-houses and shops, churches, and public buildings; we left all these, and turned down to a region of mills and warehouses; thence we passed through two massive gates into a great paved yard, and we were in Bigben Close, and the mill was before us, vomiting soot from its long chimney, and quivering through its thick brick walls with the commotion of its iron bowels.