von Rundstedt


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von Rundstedt

(German fɔn ˈrʊntʃtɛt)
n
(Biography) See Rundstedt
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Noun1.von Rundstedt - German field marshal in World War II who directed the conquest of Poland and led the Ardennes counteroffensive (1875-1953)
References in periodicals archive ?
Soon Bletchley had access to direct messages between Hitler and his commander in the West, Field Marshall von Rundstedt.
The Last Prussian: A Biography of Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt 1875-1953 (reprint, 1991)
German General Gerd von Rundstedt was racing through the Ardennes with 44 divisions and seven panzer divisions.
None of these inmates held a rank lower than general and they included Hitler's favourite army officer, Gerd von Rundstedt, the German tank Commander Erich von Manstein who had led the 1940 Blitzkrieg of 1940 in the Ardennes and the notorious SS officer, Hermann Behrends.
And after D-Day, as the Allies advanced through France and the Low Countries, it became a PoW camp, home to some 2,000 troops including top generals, even Gerd von Rundstedt, regarded by Eisenhower as "the ablest of the German generals".
The Wehrmacht remained strong under capable leaders like Erwin Rommel and Gerd von Rundstedt. Hitler's regime, the perpetrators of almost unimaginable crimes against humanity, needed to be stopped.
The massive German counteroffensive, code name Wacht am Rhein (Watch on the Rhine), is often called the Von Rundstedt Offensive or the Ardennes Counteroffensive; however, it is most commonly referred to as the Battle of the Bulge by Americans and the British.
Peake suggested that they could include key German commanders responsible for the defence of France, such as Field Marshals Erwin Rommel and Gerd von Rundstedt, as well as members of the Vichy puppet regime.
He reported to Field Marshall Gerd von Rundstedt, which caused some animosities, since responsibilities were assigned by Adolf Hitler.
Characters in the book include: Stauffenberg, Hitler, Goering, Speer, Rommel, von Rundstedt, Kesselring, Raeder, Doenitz, Neville Chamberlin, Winston Churchill, and other British and German soldiers, sailors, airmen and civilians.
It was indeed ironic that, just as the British command courted defeat and Field-Marshal Montgomery consented to a harried withdrawal across the Rhine., German Field-Marshal Model reported to his superior, Field-Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt, that the situation along the Lower Rhine was deteriorating dramatically and that, for the past week, he had been able to do no more than delay British actions.